The Individual and the Political Order: An Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy

By Norman E. Bowie; Robert L. Simon | Go to book overview
10
Ibid., pp. 269-70.
11
Some interpreters of Hobbes regard the Laws of Nature as moral rules rather than (as we suggest) prudential rules that it is in anyone's interest to support. We find such alternative interpretations unsatisfactory for ultimately some explanation must be given of why Hobbesian egoists would obey moral rules when it was not in their self-interest to do so. Usually, the reason given is fear of God's wrath. But that is just to introduce prudential considerations by the back door. For relevant essays and a helpful bibliography, see Bernard Baumrin , ed., Hobbes's Leviathan: Interpretation and Criticism ( Belmont, Calif.: Wadsworth, 1969).
12
Hobbes, Leviathan, pp. 335-36.
13
Ibid., p. 340. Although Hobbes speaks of conferring all power on the sovereign, he does suggest that the individual always retains a right (or perhaps more accurately a power or ability) to attempt to preserve his own life.
14
John Locke, Second Treatise of Government, 1690, chap. 9, sect. 13 (9, 13). This work is available in a number of editions, including that edited by Thomas P. Peardon ( Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1952), from which all quotations here are taken. Another useful edition is found in Peter Laslett, ed., John Locke's Two Treatises of Government ( New York: Cambridge University Press, 1960).
15
Wolff, In Defense of Anarchism, p. 14.
16
Ibid., p. 15.
17
Ibid., p. 18.
18
Ibid., p. 22f.
19
We owe this line of objection to Jeffrey H. Reiman, In Defense of Political Philosophy ( New York: Harper & Row, 1972), p. 35, although Reiman makes different use of it than we do here.
20
Wolff, In Defense of Anarchism, p.9.
21
Reiman, In Defense of Political Philosophy, pp. 29, 31.
22
Harry G. Frankfurt, "The Anarchism of Robert Paul Wolff," Political Theory 1, no. 4 ( 1974): 411.
23
David Lewis, Convention ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1969), p.43.

SUGGESTED READINGS

Baumrin Bernard, ed. Hobbes's Leviathan: Interpretation and Criticism. Belmont, California: Wadsworth, 1969.

Benn S. I. and Peters R. S. The Principles of Political Thought: Social Foundations of the Democratic State. New York: The Free Press, 1965. Chapters 11-14.

Carter April. The Political Theory of Anarchism. New York: Harper & Row, 1971.

Fishkin James S. Tyranny and Legitimacy. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1979.

Friedrich C. J., ed. Nomos I--Authority. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1958. A collection of articles by leading scholars.

Hart H. L. A. The Concept of Law. London: Oxford University Press, 1961. Chapters II, IV, and VI.

Hobbes Thomas. Leviathan. 1651. (Available in a variety of editions.)

Pennock J. Roland and Chapman John W., eds. Nomos XIX--Anarchism. New York: New York University Press, 1978. A collection of articles by leading scholars.

Reiman Jeffrey H. In Defense of Political Philosophy. New York: Harper & Row, 1970.

Taylor Richard. Freedom, Anarchy and the Law. 2nd ed. Buffalo: Prometheus Books, 1982. Chapters VII, VIII, XI, XII, and XIII.

Wolff Robert Paul. In Defense of Anarchism. New York: Harper & Row, 1970.

-----. The Poverty of Liberalism. Boston: Beacon Press, 1968. Chapter Two, "Loyalty."

-26-

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The Individual and the Political Order: An Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Selected Readings 5
  • One Love It or Leave It? Individual Conscience and Political Authority 7
  • Suggested Readings 26
  • Two Utilitarianism 28
  • Notes 46
  • Notes 47
  • Three Natural Rights: Meaning and Justification 72
  • Notes 74
  • Suggested Readings 75
  • Four Justice 77
  • Suggested Readings 112
  • Five Democracy and Political Obligation 114
  • Suggested Readings 140
  • Six Liberty 141
  • Notes 168
  • Notes 170
  • Seven Law and Order 171
  • Articles 201
  • Eight an Evaluation of Preferential Treatment 202
  • Notes 228
  • Notes 230
  • Nine Ethics and International Affairs 231
  • Notes 257
  • Notes 259
  • Index 260
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