Hart Crane: An Introduction and Interpretation

By Samuel Hazo | Go to book overview

CHRONOLOGY
1899 Harold Hart Crane born July 21, in Garretsville, Ohio, the
only son of Clarence Arthur and Grace Hart Crane.
1909 Sent to live at the home of his maternal grandmother in Cleve-
land following a quarrel between his parents.
1913 Enrolled at East High School in Cleveland and began to write
verse.
1915 Journey with his mother to his grandmother's plantation on the
Isle of Pines in the West Indies. Returned to Cleveland where
he met Mrs. William Vaughn Moody, the widow of the poet,
who encouraged his interest in poetry.
1916 First poem "C33" published in Bruno's Weekly. Toured the
West with his mother. After his parents' final separation and
divorce, departed for New York.
1917 Under the guardianship of Carl Schmitt, a friend of the family,
widened his circle of friends (writers Alfred Kreymborg and
Maxwell Bodenheim) and quickened his poetic interests. Began
work on a popular novel, but soon gave it up. Completed "The
Bathers."
1918 Became associate editor of The Pagan. Returned to Cleveland
and tried, in vain, to enlist for military service. After the war,
employed as a reporter for the Cleveland newspaper Plain
Dealer
.
1919 Became manager of the advertising department of The Little Re-
view
. Resigned his position and found employment with Rhein-thal and Newman Agency. In November, accepted a clerkship
in one of his father's candy stores in Akron, Ohio.
1920 Worked in father's business in Cleveland. Canvassed the area
around Washington, D.C. for candy company franchises.
1921 Severed all ties with his father and took up residence in Cleve-
land in order to resume his aprenticeship to poetry with full
dedication. Completed "Black Tambourine."
1922 Wrote advertising copy for Corday & Gross in Cleveland.
Friendships with William Sommer and Ernest Nelson (both
painter-lithographers) sustained his literary interests but had no
salutary effect upon his homosexuality and increasing alcoholism.

-viii-

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Hart Crane: An Introduction and Interpretation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • About the Author i
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chronology viii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Life 4
  • 2 - New Purities 17
  • 3 - Knowledge, Beauty and the Sea 48
  • 4 - Far Rockaway to Golden Gate 68
  • 6 - The Broken World 124
  • 7 - Beneath the Myth 133
  • Selected Bibliography 136
  • Index 142
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