Congress or the Supreme Court: Which Shall Rule America?

By Egbert Ray Nichols | Go to book overview

RE-ENACTING LEGISLATION DECLARED INVALID BY THE SUPREME COURT*

SENATOR ROBERT M. LA FOLLETTE

Mr. President, I have not objected to any criticism of an address which I delivered on June 14 before the American Federation of Labor at Cincinnati, but it does seem to me that it would have been orderly, and a matter of courtesy as between Senators, if a criticism of that sort was to be inserted in the Record, that mention should have been made of that fact to the end that the address itself, which is the subject of so much criticism and animadversion by certain Senators, might have had a place in the Record along with the criticism of the address. . . .

I was invited to deliver an address on the decision of the Supreme Court on the Child Labor Law at the annual convention of the American Federation of Labor on the 14th of June. I accepted that invitation. I delivered the address. It has not been printed anywhere so far as I am advised. Only very brief extracts from it have appeared in the public prints, and no one has had a fair opportunity to judge of what I said there. . . .

It will be remembered by Senators that the Senator from Nebraska (Mr. Norris) asked leave, in view of the fact that the criticism by Nicholas Murray Butler had

____________________
*
Remarks of Senator Robert Marion La Follette in the United States Senate and before the Annual Convention of the American Federation of Labor. Cong. Record v. 62, Pt. 9, P. 9074-9082. June 21, 1922.

-89-

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