Conservation and Economic Efficiency: An Approach to Materials Policy

By Talbot Page; African Diaspora Studies Institute | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
Blair Bower, "Studies of Residuals Management in Industry," E. C. Mills, ed., Economic Analysis of Environmental Problems ( New York, National Bureau of Economic Reseach, 1975).
2.
The definitions follow those by Blair Bower in "Studies of Residuals Management in Industry"; see also Blair Bower and Daniel Basta, Residuals--Environmental Quality Management: Applying the Concept ( Baltimore, Md., Johns Hopkins University Center for Metropolitan Planning and Research, October 1973) p. 2; and Allen Kneese and Blair Bower, "Residuals--Environmental Quality Management--Economic, Technological, Ecological, Institutional Aspects of Residuals Management: Report on a Research Program" proposed Resources for the Future publication, chapter 1.
3.
For the materials with positive prices in the "nonproduct output" circle in figure 4, recovery by either path takes place until the marginal cost of recovery equals the marginal revenue of recovery. Materials for which the marginal cost of recovery exceeds the marginal revenue have negative prices and move to the circle labeled "waste generated." From here, if the marginal cost of recovery minus the marginal revenue from recovery is less than the marginal cost of waste treatment and discharge into the environment, then there still is an incentive to recover the material. Otherwise the material takes the third exit, discharge into the environment.
4.
Thomas Quimby, Recycling: The Alternative to Disposal ( Baltimore, Md., Johns Hopkins University Press for Resources for the Future, 1975). There is an earlier version of this list of characteristics in a statement by Blair Bower in Hearings before the Subcommittee on Fiscal Policy of the Joint Economic Committee, 92 Cong. 1 sess. ( Nov. 8-9, 1971) pp. 118-133.
5.
"In the absence of expanded markets--if steel mills and foundries cannot be encouraged to use more scrap--there is every reason to believe that the metallics coming from public recycling centers would replace material now coming from scrap processing plants." Frederick Berman, president of the Institute of Scrap Iron and Steel, Inc., in the American Metal Market ( May 3, 1972) p. 9.
6.
Interview with Pat Taylor, Environmental Action, fall 1974.
7.
These observations suggest another basis or rationale for severance taxes. Negative prices are not self-administering; they encourage leaks into the environment. A second-best solution to this problem may be to shift the entire price system for materials upward; a kind of affine transformation. The proper amount of the shift occurs when the gain by having less negative prices equals the loss from distortions in price ratios.

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conservation and Economic Efficiency: An Approach to Materials Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xv
  • Title Page xix
  • 1 - Introduction: Toward A Materials Policy 15
  • Part One - Material Flows and Uses 17
  • 2 - Virgin Material Intensity and Waste Management 33
  • 3 - Competition Between Primary and Secondary Industries 34
  • Part Two - Intratemporal Efficiency 59
  • 4 - Discriminatory Pricing 61
  • 5 - Disposal 105
  • 6 - Taxes on VIrgin Materials 139
  • Part Three - Intertemporal Equity 143
  • 7 - The Present Value Criterion 170
  • 8 - The Conservation Criterion 188
  • 9 - The Criteria Reconciled 206
  • 10 - Conclusion 208
  • Appendixes 215
  • Notes 221
  • Notes 225
  • Notes 234
  • Notes 251
  • Index 253
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.