Concise Dictionary of Proper Names and Notable Matters in the Works of Dante

By Paget Toynbee | Go to book overview

O

O, letter O, Inf. xxiv. 100 [11]; for Omega, last letter of the Greek alphabet, Par. xxvi. 17 [Omega].

Oberto da Romena, Uberto, one of the Conti Guidi of the Romena branch, to whom and his younger brother Guido D. addressed a letter on the death of their uncle Alessandro, Obertus, Epist. ii. tit. [Guido da Romena.]

Obizzo da Esti, Obizzo II of Este, Marquis of Ferrara and of the March of Ancona ( 1264-1293), grandson of Azzo VII ( Azzo Novello) of Este, and son of Rinaldo and Adeleita da Romano. On the death of his grandfather in 1264 (his father having predeceased the latter in 1251) he was elected lord of Ferrara; in 1288 he received the lordship of Modena, and in the next year that of Reggio. Obizzo, who was an ardent Guelf, and supporter of Charles of Anjou in his operations against Manfred, is said to have wielded his power with pitiless cruelty. He was succeeded by his son, Azzo VIII, by whom he is commonly supposed to have been smothered, Feb. 13, 1293. D. places him among the Tyrants in Round 1 of Circle VII of Hell, where he is pointed out by Nessus, who describes him as fair-haired, and states that he had been murdered by his 'figliastro' (meaning either his 'natural', or his unnatural, son), Inf. xii. 110-12. [Azzo da Esti: Tiranni.]

Some think Obizzo (and not his son Azzo) is 'il. Marchese' referred to by Venetico Caccianimico (in Bolgia 1 of Circle VIII of Hell), in connexion with the seduction of his sister, Ghisolabella, Inf. xviii. 55-7. [Caccianimico, Venedico: Ghisolabella.]

Oc, Lingua. [LinguaOc.]

Occidente, the West, Inf. xxvi. 113; Purg. xxvi. 5; xxvii. 63; Par. vi. 71 (where Justinian, Emperor of the East, speaks of the W. to D., as an Italian, as 'il vostro occidente'); of the movement of the Heavens from E. to W., Conv. ii. 339-45, 6145-7; of the dual movement of the Heaven of the Fixed Stars, viz. the diurnal one from E. to W., and the almost imperceptible one of one degree in 100 years from W. to E., Conv. ii. 6141-7, 1512-13 [Cielo Stellato]; of the oblique movement of the Heaven of the Sun from W. to E., Conv. iii. 5126-30 [Sole, Cielo del]; Occidens, of the W. limits of the langue d'oïl, V. E. i. 861-2 [Lingua Oil]; the quarter where the Sun sets, Ponente, Inf. xix. 83; Purg. ii. 15.

Oceano, the Ocean, the waters of which, according to the old belief, encircled the whole Earth, Mare Oceano, Conv. iii. 582, 94, 118; alluded to as quel mar che la terra inghirlanda, Par. ix. 84; Oceanus, the limit of the Emperor's jurisdiction, Mon. i. 1183; Epist. vii. 358; viii. 11183.

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Concise Dictionary of Proper Names and Notable Matters in the Works of Dante
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Abbreviations viii
  • A 1
  • B 62
  • C 99
  • D 172
  • E 199
  • F 218
  • G 248
  • H 291
  • I 293
  • J 309
  • L 318
  • M 343
  • N 382
  • O 391
  • P 401
  • Q 445
  • R 446
  • S 468
  • T 506
  • U 533
  • V 542
  • X 555
  • Z 555
  • Tables 557
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