Concise Dictionary of Proper Names and Notable Matters in the Works of Dante

By Paget Toynbee | Go to book overview

P

P, first letter of the word peccato, 'sin'; at the entrance into Purgatory the guardian Angel inscribes upon D.'s brow with the point of his sword seven P's ( Purg. ix. 112; xii. 121; piaghe, ix. 114; xv. 80; xxv. 139; colpo, xxii. 3) and bids him cleanse them away when he is within, Purg. x. 112-14.

These seven P's are the symbols of the seven deadly sins, viz. Pride, Envy, Anger, Sloth, Avarice, Gluttony, and Lust, and are removed one by one as D. passes through the Circles where the traces of these sins are purged away. The first six are removed by the passage over D's face of the wings of the several Angels who are present in the several Circles; that of Pride is removed by the Angel of Humility ( Purg. xii. 98), and at the same time all the others are lightened (vv.118-26); that of Envy is removed by the Angel of Charity ( Purg. xv. 34-9, 80); that of Anger is removed by the Angel of Peace ( Purg. xvii. 67-9); that of Sloth is removed by the Angel of the Love of God ( Purg. xix. 49- 51); that of Avarice is removed by the Angel of Justice ( Purg. xxii. 2-6) ; that of Gluttony is removed by the Angel of Abstinence ( Purg. xxiv. 148-54; the seventh and last P (that of Lust) is only removed by D.'s passing through the fire ( Purg. xxv. 139), as he learns from the Angel of Purity ( Purg. xxvii. 6-11). [Purgatorio.]

Pachino, Pachynus, now CapePassaro, promontory at the SE. extremity of Sicily; mentioned by Charles Martel (in the Heaven of Venus) together with Pelorus, the NE. extremity, to indicate the extent of the E. coast of Sicily, Par. viii. 68 (cf. Ovid, Metam. v. 350-1) [Peloro]; Pachynus, Ecl. ii. 59.

Pachynus. [Pachino.]

Pactolis, belonging to Pactolus, river of Lydia, which rises on Mt. Tmolus, and flows past Sardis into the Hermus; its golden sands, according to the story, were the consequence of King Midas bathing in the stream, at the bidding of Bacchus, in order to rid himself of his fatal gift of turning everything he touched into gold.

Midas is referred to in allusion to this incident, Ecl. ii. 53. [Mida.]

Pado. [Po.]

Padova, Padua, city of N. Italy, on the Bacchiglione (which joins the Brenta a few miles below), about 25 miles W. of Venice and 18 SE. of Vicenza. It claims to be the oldest city in Italy, and to have been founded by the Trojan Anterior [Antenori]. In 1237 Ezzelino da Romano, with the help of Frederick II and the Ghibellines, obtained possession of the city, but on the proclamation of the crusade against him by Pope Alexander IV in 1255 he was expelled by the Paduan Guelfs and the Venetians [Azzolino1]. After the death of Ezzelino in 1259 the Guelfs

-401-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Concise Dictionary of Proper Names and Notable Matters in the Works of Dante
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Abbreviations viii
  • A 1
  • B 62
  • C 99
  • D 172
  • E 199
  • F 218
  • G 248
  • H 291
  • I 293
  • J 309
  • L 318
  • M 343
  • N 382
  • O 391
  • P 401
  • Q 445
  • R 446
  • S 468
  • T 506
  • U 533
  • V 542
  • X 555
  • Z 555
  • Tables 557
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved in your active project from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 568

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.