Concise Dictionary of Proper Names and Notable Matters in the Works of Dante

By Paget Toynbee | Go to book overview

T

Tabernic, -icch, -icchi. [ Tambernic.]

Tacco, Ghin di. [Ghin di Tacco.]

Taddeo, Taddeo, d'Alderotto of Florence, celebrated physician, and reputed founder of the scientific school of medicine at the University of Bologna, born c. 1215, died 1295. He wrote commentaries on the works of Hippocrates and Galen, with philosophical illustrations, and owing to his eminence as a physician was surnamed ' Ippocratista'. He also made an Italian translation of the Latin version of Aristotle Ethics.

He is coupled by St. Bonaventura (in the Heaven of the Sun) with Henry of Susa, the Decretalist, Par. xii. 83 (where the two represent the iura ed aforismi of Par. xi. 4). [Aforismi: Decretalistae]; D. speaks with contempt of his translation (as is supposed) of the Ethics, Conv. i. 1070-1.

Tagliacozzo, village of Central Italy, in the Abruzzi, about twenty miles S. of Aquila, in the neighbourhood of which Charles of Anjou, with the help of the veteran Erard de Valéry, by means of a stratagem, with inferior numbers, defeated Conradin, the last of the Hohenstaufen ( Aug. 23, 1268), Inf. xxviii. 17. [Alardo: Curradino.]

Tagliamento, torrential river of N. Italy, which rises in the Carnic Alps above Tolmezzo, and flowing through the province of Udine in Venetia, falls into the upper Adriatic some forty miles NE. of Venice.

Cunizza (in the Heaven of Venus) mentions the Tagliamento as one of the boundaries of the March of Treviso, whose peoples she refers to as la turba presente, Che Tagliamento e Adice richiude, Par. ix. 43- 4. [Adice: Marca Trivisiana.]

Taide, Thais, name of courtesan introduced by Terence in his Eunuchus (iii. 1).

D. places her (as if she were a real person and not merely a fictitious character in a play) among the Flatterers in Bolgia 2 of Circle VIII of Hell (Malebolge), Inf. xviii. 133; sozza e scapigliata fante, v. 130 (cf. "Isaiah" iii. 16, 24) [Adulatori]; she is pointed out by Virgil, who says that she is the harlot who, when asked by her paramour, 'Have I great thanks with thee?' answered, 'Nay, marvellous' (vv. 133-5). This passage from the Eunuchus is here quoted by D., not direct from the play of Terence (with which he was probably not acquainted), but from the De Amicitia of Cicero (§§ 98) where it is introduced in illustration of the habitual exaggeration indulged in by flatterers. D., through ignorance of the context of the play itself, has attributed to Thais (whom he describes as a harlot perhaps by confusion with the Athenian courtesan) the reply ('ingentes') put by

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Concise Dictionary of Proper Names and Notable Matters in the Works of Dante
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Abbreviations viii
  • A 1
  • B 62
  • C 99
  • D 172
  • E 199
  • F 218
  • G 248
  • H 291
  • I 293
  • J 309
  • L 318
  • M 343
  • N 382
  • O 391
  • P 401
  • Q 445
  • R 446
  • S 468
  • T 506
  • U 533
  • V 542
  • X 555
  • Z 555
  • Tables 557
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