Science and Superstition in the Eighteenth Century: A Study of the Treatment of Science in Two Encyclopedias of 1725-1750: Chambers' Cyclopedia, London (1728); Zedler's Universal Lexicon, Leipzig (1732-1750)

By Philip Shorr | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
CHAMBERS' CYCLOPEDIA AND THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE

CHAMBERS' Cyclopedia, published in 1728, is largely a systematic compilation of accumulated knowledge. And that is perhaps what a cyclopedia should be. It has no point of view of its own; the lexicographer makes no effort to be any more than a recorder of the accepted ideas and facts of his time. In that respect it differs from L'Encyclopédie which was published some two decades later and was at first intended to be little more than a French adaptation of Chambers'. L'Encyclopédie is not merely a record of civilization, it is also a critique. Undoubtedly it laid the intellectual foundation for the French Revolution. But in another respect Chambers' Cyclopedia may be considered a forerunner of L'Encyclopédie. Aside from its attack on Church and State, L'Encyclopédie is chiefly concerned with science. "Scientific research is its very essence."1 In its very title, Encyclopédie ou dictionnaire raisanné des sciences, des arts et des métiers par la société des gens de lettres, science comes first. Chambers too is much concerned with science. He is almost willing to compare his age with that of Augustus because of its great progress in experimental science.2 And his Cyclopedia he calls a "Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences." To be sure both Diderot and D'Alembert were far greater

____________________
1
Thorndike, L., "L'Encyclopédie and the history of science," in Isis, VI ( 1924), p. 363.
2
In his address to the King Chambers says: "The time is now at hand when we are no longer to envy Rome her Augustus and Augustan Age; but Rome in her turn shall envy ours. . . . Numerous presages give us room to expect that . . . what Greece was under Alexander, and Rome under Augustus Caesar, Britain shall be under George and Caroline."

-12-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Science and Superstition in the Eighteenth Century: A Study of the Treatment of Science in Two Encyclopedias of 1725-1750: Chambers' Cyclopedia, London (1728); Zedler's Universal Lexicon, Leipzig (1732-1750)
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Table of Contents 5
  • Chapter I- Introduction 7
  • Chapter II- Chambers'' Cyclopedia and the History of Science 12
  • Chapter III- Zedler''s Grosses Vollständiges Universal Lexicon and the History of Science 35
  • Chapter IV- Conclusion 74
  • Bibliography 78
  • Index 81
  • Vita 83
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 84

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.