Personal History of Lord Bacon: From Unpublished Papers

By William Hepworth Dixon | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV.
TREASON OF SIR JOHN SMYTH.

1 1. THE Queen not only endows Bacon with lands, and with the reversion of lands and offices, but employs him in her legal and political affairs; often in business which would seem to belong exclusively to the department of Fleming or of Coke. As her Counsel learned in the Law, he is engaged in the prosecution of William Randal. He is consulted in the more momentous charge against Sir John Smyth, who stands accused of no less a crime than that of an attempt, under circumstances of peculiar guilt, to provoke a military mutiny and insurrection against the Queen.

1596. May.

2 2. In the spring of 1596 an expedition, meant to anticipate the Roman league, has been arming in the Thames. Its destination is unknown, though the few suspect that a blow will fall on the most prosperous and beautiful of Spanish ports. Raleigh is still at home; Keymish having gone with his fleet of ships to the

____________________
1
Egerton, Fleming, and Bacon to the Council, May 3, 1596, S. P. O.; Lucas to the Council, June 23, 1596, S. P. O.
2
Lambeth MSS. 657, fol. 29, 30.

-80-

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Personal History of Lord Bacon: From Unpublished Papers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Note from the Author. v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I - The Biographers 1
  • Chapter II - Early Years 13
  • Chapter III - The Earl of Essex. 47
  • Chapter IV - Treason of Sir John Smyth. 80
  • Chapter V - The Irish Plot 109
  • Chapter VI - The Street Fight 132
  • Chapter VII - The New Reign. 152
  • Chapter VIII - Solicitor-General. 190
  • Chapter IX - St. John and Peacham 218
  • Chapter X - Race with Coke. 241
  • Chapter Xi. Lord Chancellor. 272
  • Chapter XII - Fees 290
  • Appendices. 359
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