Nile Notes of a Howadji

By George William Curtis | Go to book overview

II.
THE DRAG'-O-MEN.

As we stepped on board, we should have said, "In the name of God, the compassionate, the merciful." For so say all pious Muslim, undertaking an arduous task; and so let all pious Howadji exclaim when they set forth with any of those "guides, philosophers, and friends," the couriers of the Orient--the Dragomen.

These gentry figure well in the Eastern books. The young traveller, already enamored of Eothen's Dhemetri, or Warburton's Mahmoud, or Harriet Martineau's Alee, leaps ashore, expecting to find a very Pythias to his Damon mood, and in his constant companion to embrace a concrete Orient. These are his Alexandrian emotions and hopes. Those poets, Harriet and Eliot, are guilty of much. Possibly as the youth descends the Lebanon to Beyrout, five months later, he will still confess that it was the concrete Orient; but own that he knew not the East, in those merely Mediterranean moods of hope and romantic reading.

-10-

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Nile Notes of a Howadji
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. vii
  • Contents ix
  • I- Going to Boulak. 1
  • II- The Drag'-O-Men. 10
  • III- Hadji Hamed. 22
  • IV- The Ibis Sings. 29
  • V- The Crew. 37
  • VI- The Ibis Flies. 47
  • VII- The Landscape. 54
  • VIII- Tracking. 61
  • IX- Flying. 67
  • X- Verde Giovane and Fellow-Mariners. 71
  • XI- Verde Piu Giovane. 77
  • XII- Asyoot. 85
  • Xiii. The Sun. 96
  • Xiv. Thebes Triumphant. 103
  • Xv. The Crocodile. 105
  • Xvi. Getting Ashore. 114
  • Xvii. Fair Frailty. 117
  • Xviii. Fair Frailty--Continued. 124
  • Xix. Kushuk Arnem. 130
  • Xx. Terpsichore. 140
  • Xxi. Sakias. 146
  • Xxiii. Alms! O Shopkeeper! 152
  • Xxiv. Syene. 168
  • Xxv. The Treaty of Syene. 175
  • Xxvi. The Cataract. 184
  • Xxvii. Nubian Welcome. 192
  • Xxviii. Philæ. 197
  • Xxix. A Crow That Flies in Heaven's Sweetest Air. 206
  • Xxx. Southward. 215
  • Xxxi. Ultima Thule. 224
  • Xxxii. Northward. 234
  • Xxxiii. By the Grace of God. 250
  • Xxxvii. Dead Kings. 293
  • Xxxviii. Buried. 300
  • Xxxix. Dead Queens. 308
  • Xl. Et Cetera. 312
  • Xli. The Memnonium. 316
  • Xlii. Medeenet Haboo. 321
  • Xliii. Karnak. 329
  • Xliv. Pruning. 339
  • Xlv. Per Contra. 346
  • Xlvi. Memphis. 352
  • Xlvii. Sunset. 361
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