Nile Notes of a Howadji

By George William Curtis | Go to book overview

VII.
THE LANDSCAPE.

THE Nile landscape is not monotonous, although of one general character. In that soft air the lines change constantly, but imperceptibly, and are always so delicately lined and drawn, that the eye swims satisfied along the warm tranquillity of the scenery.

Egypt is the valley of the Nile. At its widest part it is, perhaps, six or seven miles broad, and is walled upon the west by the Libyan mountains, and upon the east by the Arabian. The scenery is simple and grand. The forms of the landscape harmonize with the forms of the impression of Egypt in the mind. Solemn, and still, and inexplicable, sits that antique mystery among the flowery fancies and broad green fertile feelings of your mind and contemporary life, as the sphinx sits upon the edge of the grain-green plain. No scenery is grander in its impression, for none is so symbolical. The land seems to have died with the race that made

-54-

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Nile Notes of a Howadji
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. vii
  • Contents ix
  • I- Going to Boulak. 1
  • II- The Drag'-O-Men. 10
  • III- Hadji Hamed. 22
  • IV- The Ibis Sings. 29
  • V- The Crew. 37
  • VI- The Ibis Flies. 47
  • VII- The Landscape. 54
  • VIII- Tracking. 61
  • IX- Flying. 67
  • X- Verde Giovane and Fellow-Mariners. 71
  • XI- Verde Piu Giovane. 77
  • XII- Asyoot. 85
  • Xiii. The Sun. 96
  • Xiv. Thebes Triumphant. 103
  • Xv. The Crocodile. 105
  • Xvi. Getting Ashore. 114
  • Xvii. Fair Frailty. 117
  • Xviii. Fair Frailty--Continued. 124
  • Xix. Kushuk Arnem. 130
  • Xx. Terpsichore. 140
  • Xxi. Sakias. 146
  • Xxiii. Alms! O Shopkeeper! 152
  • Xxiv. Syene. 168
  • Xxv. The Treaty of Syene. 175
  • Xxvi. The Cataract. 184
  • Xxvii. Nubian Welcome. 192
  • Xxviii. Philæ. 197
  • Xxix. A Crow That Flies in Heaven's Sweetest Air. 206
  • Xxx. Southward. 215
  • Xxxi. Ultima Thule. 224
  • Xxxii. Northward. 234
  • Xxxiii. By the Grace of God. 250
  • Xxxvii. Dead Kings. 293
  • Xxxviii. Buried. 300
  • Xxxix. Dead Queens. 308
  • Xl. Et Cetera. 312
  • Xli. The Memnonium. 316
  • Xlii. Medeenet Haboo. 321
  • Xliii. Karnak. 329
  • Xliv. Pruning. 339
  • Xlv. Per Contra. 346
  • Xlvi. Memphis. 352
  • Xlvii. Sunset. 361
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