Nile Notes of a Howadji

By George William Curtis | Go to book overview

XXIV.
SYENE.

Some from farthest South--
Syene, and where the shadow both way falls,
Meroe, Nilotick isle."

APPROACHING Assouan, or the Greek Syene, which we will henceforth call it, as more graceful and musical, the high bluffs with bold masses of rock heralded a new scenery--and its sharp lofty forms were like the pealing trumpet tones, announcing the crisis of the struggle. It was a pleasant January morning, that the Ibis skimmed along the shore. The scenery was bolder than any she had seen in her flight. Rocks broke the evenness of the river's surface, and in the heart of the hills the river seemed to end, it was so shut in by the rocky cliffs and points.

The town Syene is a dull mud mass, like all other Egyptian towns. But palms spread luxuriantly along the bank, and on the shores of Elephantine--the island opposite--sweeps and slopes of greenery stretched westward from the eye.

Upon that shore the eye lingers curiously upon the

-168-

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Nile Notes of a Howadji
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. vii
  • Contents ix
  • I- Going to Boulak. 1
  • II- The Drag'-O-Men. 10
  • III- Hadji Hamed. 22
  • IV- The Ibis Sings. 29
  • V- The Crew. 37
  • VI- The Ibis Flies. 47
  • VII- The Landscape. 54
  • VIII- Tracking. 61
  • IX- Flying. 67
  • X- Verde Giovane and Fellow-Mariners. 71
  • XI- Verde Piu Giovane. 77
  • XII- Asyoot. 85
  • Xiii. The Sun. 96
  • Xiv. Thebes Triumphant. 103
  • Xv. The Crocodile. 105
  • Xvi. Getting Ashore. 114
  • Xvii. Fair Frailty. 117
  • Xviii. Fair Frailty--Continued. 124
  • Xix. Kushuk Arnem. 130
  • Xx. Terpsichore. 140
  • Xxi. Sakias. 146
  • Xxiii. Alms! O Shopkeeper! 152
  • Xxiv. Syene. 168
  • Xxv. The Treaty of Syene. 175
  • Xxvi. The Cataract. 184
  • Xxvii. Nubian Welcome. 192
  • Xxviii. Philæ. 197
  • Xxix. A Crow That Flies in Heaven's Sweetest Air. 206
  • Xxx. Southward. 215
  • Xxxi. Ultima Thule. 224
  • Xxxii. Northward. 234
  • Xxxiii. By the Grace of God. 250
  • Xxxvii. Dead Kings. 293
  • Xxxviii. Buried. 300
  • Xxxix. Dead Queens. 308
  • Xl. Et Cetera. 312
  • Xli. The Memnonium. 316
  • Xlii. Medeenet Haboo. 321
  • Xliii. Karnak. 329
  • Xliv. Pruning. 339
  • Xlv. Per Contra. 346
  • Xlvi. Memphis. 352
  • Xlvii. Sunset. 361
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