VI MAU MAU OATH CEREMONIES

In the days before the State of Emergency was declared the ceremonies which accompanied the administration of the Mau Mau oath were simple and relatively harmless when compared to the many new, more elaborate and bestial accompaniments of the oath which have since been instituted.

Today there are at least seven, perhaps eight, grades of oaths and all the higher grades involve concomitant acts of incredible beastliness and depravity. Before passing to these advanced stages of the oath and of their effect upon those who are subjected to them, I must outline, a little more fully than I did in my earlier book, how the 'first oath' is administered and how it worked.

There are of course many legal and recognised forms of Kikuyu oath which are taken openly and in accordance with Native Law and Custom, in connection with litigation.

Quite apart from the fact that the Mau Mau oath, even in its simplest 'first oath' form, is illegal--through having been declared so by Government, it was also illegal from the point of view of Native Law and Custom. It borrowed elements and ideas from many recognised oath ceremonies, but it differed from all recognised oaths in so many ways that it could not be said to conform to Native Law and Custom in any way at all. The whole object of the first oath--an oath which the leaders intended should be administered to every single Kikuyu--man, woman, and child--was to obtain such a hold over each person through psychological fear, that they would at least be passive and not do anything in open opposition to Mau Mau, even if they did nothing to help it.

-77-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Defeating Mau Mau
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • I- The Present Position 1
  • II- Mau Mau Aims 21
  • III- Mau Mau Organisation 32
  • V- Mau Mau Propaganda 53
  • VI- Mau Mau Oath Ceremonies 77
  • VII- Mau Mau Methods 94
  • VIII- Mau Mau and Other Tribes 103
  • IX- Kikuyu 'Loyalists' and Home Guards 110
  • X- The Handicaps of The Security Forces 117
  • XI- What Must Be Done: Religious, Educational, and Economic Reforms 127
  • XII- What Must Be Done: Social and Political Reforms 142
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 152

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.