Rilke, Europe, and the English-Speaking World

By Eudo C. Mason | Go to book overview

NOTES
Where no reference is given for quotations from letters, beyond the date and the name of the receiver, the letter in question is to be found in one or other of the Insel-Verlag's chronologically arranged collected editions of Rilke's letters:
A. The 6-volume edition ( 1929-37), edited by Ruth Sieber-Rilke and Carl Sieber, in which 896 different letters are represented, many of them only in short extracts. (Four letters are given twice.)
B. The 5-volume edition ( 1939-40), also edited by Ruth Sieber-Rilke and Carl Sieber, in which 785 different letters are represented, nearly of them substantially complete; the volume for 1914-21 is taken over quite unchanged from edition A.
C. The 2-volume edition ( 1950), edited by the ' Rilke-Archiv' in conjunction with Ruth Sieber-Rilke and Karl Altheim, in which 435 different letters are represented, many of them only in short extracts.
Textually and in the annotations edition B shows a great advance on A, and C on B. But in contents neither of the earlier editions have been superseded by C. For serious purposes all three editions have to be used side by side, and the following facts show how difficult and pointless it would be to try to indicate with page- and volume-numbers exactly where each of the many quotations here involved is to be found:
i. Of the 1,119 different letters represented in all three editions together, 391 occur in one of them only (188 in edition A, 65 in B, 138 in C);
ii. 459 occur in two editions only (431 in A and B; 8 in A and C; 20 in B and C);
iii. 269 occur in all three editions;
iv. Letters given more or less completely in one edition (especially in B) are often represented only by short extracts in others (especially in A and C).
v. Edition C of 1950, in giving us 138 letters not contained in A or B, is not really enriching us with new material anything like so much as at first appears. Of these 138 additional letters, no fewer than 69 (exactly half) are simply taken over from the Briefe an einen jungen Dichter ( 1929), Briefe an eine junge Frau ( 1930) and Briefe an seinen Verleger ( 1934), publications which have been much reprinted in very large numbers and can by no means be regarded as superseded. Of the remaining 69 additional letters in edition C, 40 had appeared in print previously, but were not easily accessible. Only 29 are really new, but they are extremely important.

-194-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rilke, Europe, and the English-Speaking World
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 257

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.