The Wheels of Chance: A Bicycling Idyll

By H. G. Wells | Go to book overview

HOW MR. HOOPDRIVER REACHED MIDHURST

XIV

IT was one of my uncle's profoundest remarks that human beings are the only unreasonable creatures. This observation was so far justified by Mr. Hoopdriver that, after spending the morning tortuously avoiding the other man in brown and the Young Lady in Grey, he spent a considerable part of the afternoon in thinking about the Young Lady in Grey, and contemplating in an optimistic spirit the possibilities of seeing her again. Memory and imagination played round her, so that his course was largely determined by the windings of the road he traversed. Of one general proposition he was absolutely convinced. "There's something Juicy wrong with, 'em," said he-- once even aloud. But what it was he could not imagine. He recapitulated the facts. "Miss Beaumont" --brother and sister--and the stoppage to quarrel and weep--it was perplexing material for a young man of small experience. There was no exertion he

-92-

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The Wheels of Chance: A Bicycling Idyll
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • The Wheels of Chance 1
  • The Riding Forth of Mr. Hoopdriver 17
  • The Shameful Episode of the Young Lady in Grey 29
  • On the Road to Ripley 40
  • How Mr. Hoopdriver Was Haunted 59
  • The Imaginings of Mr. Hoopdriver's Heart 69
  • Omissions 76
  • The Dreams of Mr. Hoopdriver 79
  • How Mr. Hoopdriver Went to Haslemere 84
  • How Mr. Hoopdriver Reached Midhurst 92
  • An Interlude 99
  • Of the Artificial in Man, and of the Zeitgeist 105
  • The Encounter at Midhurst 109
  • The Pursuit 127
  • At Bognor 136
  • The Moonlight Ride 157
  • The Surbiton Interlude 167
  • The Awakening of Mr. Hoopdriver 178
  • The Departure from Chichester 185
  • The Unexpected Anecdote of the Lion 197
  • The Rescue Expedition 207
  • Mr. Hoopdriver, Knight Errant 231
  • The Abasement of Mr. Hoopdriver 256
  • In the New Forest 280
  • At the Rufus Stone 297
  • The Envoy 317
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