The Wheels of Chance: A Bicycling Idyll

By H. G. Wells | Go to book overview

THE DEPARTURE FROM CHICHESTER

XXVIII

HE caused his 'sister' to be called repeatedly, and when she came down, explained with a humorous smile his legal relationship to the bicycle in the yard. "Might be disagreeable, y' know." His anxiety was obvious enough. "Very well," she said (quite friendly); "hurry breakfast, and we'll ride out. I want to talk things over with you." The girl seemed more beautiful than ever after the night's sleep; her hair in comely dark waves from her forehead, her ungauntleted finger-tips pink and cool. And how decided she was! Breakfast was a nervous ceremony, conversation fraternal but thin; the waiter overawed him, and he was cowed by a multiplicity of forks. But she called him "Chris." They discussed their route over his sixpenny county map for the sake of talking, but avoided a decision in the presence of the attendant. The five-pound note was changed for the bill, and through Hoopdriver's determination to be quite the gentleman, the waiter

-185-

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The Wheels of Chance: A Bicycling Idyll
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • The Wheels of Chance 1
  • The Riding Forth of Mr. Hoopdriver 17
  • The Shameful Episode of the Young Lady in Grey 29
  • On the Road to Ripley 40
  • How Mr. Hoopdriver Was Haunted 59
  • The Imaginings of Mr. Hoopdriver's Heart 69
  • Omissions 76
  • The Dreams of Mr. Hoopdriver 79
  • How Mr. Hoopdriver Went to Haslemere 84
  • How Mr. Hoopdriver Reached Midhurst 92
  • An Interlude 99
  • Of the Artificial in Man, and of the Zeitgeist 105
  • The Encounter at Midhurst 109
  • The Pursuit 127
  • At Bognor 136
  • The Moonlight Ride 157
  • The Surbiton Interlude 167
  • The Awakening of Mr. Hoopdriver 178
  • The Departure from Chichester 185
  • The Unexpected Anecdote of the Lion 197
  • The Rescue Expedition 207
  • Mr. Hoopdriver, Knight Errant 231
  • The Abasement of Mr. Hoopdriver 256
  • In the New Forest 280
  • At the Rufus Stone 297
  • The Envoy 317
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