CIBA Foundation Symposium on Pulmonary Structure and Function

By A. V. S. De Reuck; Maeve O'Connor | Go to book overview

PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE MEASUREMENTS USING RADIOACTIVE GASES

J. B. WEST, C. T. DOLLERY and P. HUGH-JONES Department of Medicine, Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, London

RADIOGRAPHY has been used so successfully for so long in studying the lung that it is odd that radioactive isotopes have only recently been introduced for this purpose. For the lung is particularly suitable for examination by radiation, since it is a large homogeneous organ, easily penetrated by radiation, and covered by a relatively thin layer of mainly soft tissue. This paper describes some of the work done at Hammersmith Hospital during the last five years using cyclotron-produced short-lived gaseous isotopes. First, some of the recent work on the interpretation of the data will be discussed because much more is now known about what these isotopes can measure. The second part refers to some ways in which these new techniques have thrown light on pulmonary gas exchange.


Methods

Most of our work has been done using a single-breath technique which has many advantages but some disadvantages. Its chief virtue is that it allows the comparison of both ventilation and gas exchange in two regions of the lung in one breath. The procedure in brief is as follows. Oxygen-15 is prepared by deuteron bombardment of nitrogen in the Medical Research Council cyclotron ( Dysonet al., 1960), and because the isotope has a halflife of only two minutes it is produced by a continuous flow process. It is pumped to the clinical investigation room via a

-159-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
CIBA Foundation Symposium on Pulmonary Structure and Function
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 403

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.