CIBA Foundation Symposium on Pulmonary Structure and Function

By A. V. S. De Reuck; Maeve O'Connor | Go to book overview

PULMONARY CAPILLARY BLOOD FLOW AND GAS EXCHANGE*

ARTHUR B. DUBOIS, JORGE SONI, KHALIL A. FEISAL, and PHILIP KIMBEL

Department of Physiology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

THE principles governing the diffusion and exchange of gases in the lungs have been reviewed by Forster ( 1957), and many aspects of pulmonary blood flow have been covered in recent monographs ( Adams and Veith, 1959; Daley Goodwin and Steiner, 1960). The parts played by oxygen, carbon dioxide and by reflexes in the regulation of the pulmonary circulation and in the distribution of blood flow are of great interest ( Dawes and Comroe, 1954; Aviado, 1960; Duke, 1961). Similarly, compression of the lungs, or their hyperinflation, by reducing the calibre of the vessels probably interferes with the pulmonary blood flow ( Howell Permutt and Proctor, 1961). Ultimately, these responses may explain the genesis of cor pulmonale in patients with restriction of thoracic expansion, as well as in pulmonary hyperinflation. However, the rôle of these responses in man is still under investigation. But recent measurements of the dynamic factors have thrown further light upon the mechanics of pulmonary blood flow and kinetics of gas exchange, and it is these findings which form the substance of this report. Herein,

____________________
*
Parts of this work were supported by research contracts with the United States Public Health Service (H-4797), and the Medical Laboratories of the United States Army Chemical Center (Da-18-108-CML6556).
This work was carried out during the tenure of an Established Investigatorship of the American Heart Association.
International Postdoctoral Research Fellow of the National Institutes of Health. Present address: Institute of Cardiology, Mexico City, Mexico.

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