Modern Classical Philosophers: Selections Illustrating Modern Philosophy from Bruno to Bergson

By Benjamin Rand | Go to book overview

MODERN CLASSICAL PHILOSOPHERS

GIORDANO BRUNO (1548-1600)

CONCERNING THE CAUSE, THE PRINCIPLE, AND THE ONE

Translated from the Italian* by JOSIAH ROYCE and KATHARINE ROYCE


SECOND DIALOGUE1
AURELIUS DIXON
THEOPHILUS
PERSONAGES
GERVASIUS
POLYHYMNIUS

Dixon.Have the kindness, Master Polyhymnius, and you too, Gervasius, not to interrupt our discourse further.

Polyhymnius.So be it.

Gervasius.If he who is the master speaks, surely I shall be unable to keep silence.

Dix.Then you say, Theophilus, that everything which is not a first principle and a first cause, has such a principle and such a cause?

Theophilus.Without doubt and without the least controversy.

DisxDo you believe, accordingly, that whoever knows the

____________________
*
From DelLa causa, principio, ed uno. Venet. [or London] 1584.
1
The dialogues which constitute this work, Della causa, etc., are the product of an effort to state a thought which Bruno felt to be his own, under the limitations of language imposed by the current scholastic terminology, and especially by the traditional Aristotelian distinctions of form and matter, of final and efficient cause, of potentia, or possibility, of actus, or actuality, etc. These distinctions ought to be in the student's mind as he reads the dialogue. But the historical phraseology is in general rather an encumbrance than an aid

-1-

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Modern Classical Philosophers: Selections Illustrating Modern Philosophy from Bruno to Bergson
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Giordano Bruno (1548-1600) 1
  • Francis Bacon (1561-1626) 24
  • Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) 57
  • RenÉ Descartes (1596-1650) 101
  • Baruch De Spinoza (1632-1677) 148
  • Gottfried Wilhelm Von Leibnitz (1646-1716) 199
  • John Locke (1632-1704) 215
  • George Berkeley (1685-1753) 263
  • David Hume (1711-1766) 307
  • Etienne Bonnot De Condillac (1715-1780) 347
  • Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) 376
  • Johann Gottlieb Fichte (1762-1814) 486
  • Friedrich Wilhelm Von Schelling. (1775-1854) 535
  • Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831) 569
  • Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) 629
  • Auguste Comte (1798-1857) 672
  • John Stuart Mill (1806-1873) 690
  • Herbert Spencer (1820-1903) 703
  • Index 733
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