Global Logistics and Strategy, 1940-1943

By Richard M. Leighton; Robert W. Coakley | Go to book overview

Preface

The great conflict of 1939-45 was not the first world war (nor even the second), nor was it the first war that drove some of its participants close to the limits of their material resources. But in the combination of these characteristics it brought forth problems, in the technical and administrative spheres, of a degree if not of a kind that was new in the history of warfare. World War II produced, in effect, a new logistics -- new in that it was at once interconnected and global. Every local logistical problem was part of a larger whole; none could be settled without consideration of the impact its settlement would have on other local problems, often in a widening circle of repercussions rippling clear around to the other face of the world. As the war itself was global, the logistics of each battle or campaign often had world-wide ramifications, even though the outcome of the operation itself might be purely local in its effects. A handful of landing craft, two or three freighters, a few precious tanks used at one spot might mean a desperate lack somewhere else.

In this volume we have viewed the logistical problems of the U.S. Army in World War II from the point of view that most accentuated their interconnected and global character -- the point of view of the high command and staffs in Washington. We have confined ourselves to those large problems that more or less constantly engaged the attention of the high command: transportation across oceans and continents -- division of effort and resources in a coalition of sovereign, unequally endowed nations, different in their interests and outlook -- co-ordination of logistical support of "joint" operations employing land, sea, and air power in varying admixtures -- development of effective planning techniques for anticipating needs in men and matériel long before they emerged -- organizational and administrative difficulties attendant upon mobilization and an unprecedented expansion of the nation's military power -- the delicate relationships between strategy and logistics, especially in the formulation of strategic plans -- the frictions of interagency co-ordination, both within the Military Establishment and between it and the civilian authorities. The most persistent theme is the chronic, pervasive competition for resources -- a competition that was scarcely diminished even when the war machine began to pour out those resources with a prodigality the world had never before seen.

This approach has its disadvantages. In looking out from the center at a distant horizon, so to speak, we may have missed some of the hard and humdrum reality of logistics, as many of our readers no doubt experienced it --

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Global Logistics and Strategy, 1940-1943
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 780

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.