Global Logistics and Strategy, 1940-1943

By Richard M. Leighton; Robert W. Coakley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
The Support of Overseas Operations

The Army's requirements and distribution policies were both oriented to the support of overseas operations, the former in a long-term, the latter in a short-term sense. To supply the overseas theaters and the troops about to be sent to them was perhaps the largest single task of the Army's logistical organization. The procedural mechanisms developed in 1942 to perform this task are the primary subject of the present chapter. A closely related and scarcely less formidable task -- training service troops to support overseas operations-was a matter of unending concern to logisticians even though it has not always been considered to belong to the sphere of logistics. While the problem of service troops cannot be treated in full in this volume, brief attention is here given to the difficulties encountered in developing an adequate service troop basis within the framework of the Army's allotted manpower.


The System of Overseas Supply

Along with other important features of the Army's wartime logistical system, the general pattern of wartime overseas supply policies, procedures, and organization was worked out by the G-4 staff before the end of January 1942. General instructions were published on the 22d, effective 1 March. The salient feature of the system there outlined was the decentralization of the administration of most overseas supply on a geographical basis to the ports of embarkation, each of which was to serve certain specified theaters and bases. To the War Department were left, in general, control of the distribution of scarce matériel, allocation of shipping, co-ordination of supply with strategic needs (for example, determining intertheater priorities), and matters of general policy. After the reorganization of March 1942, SOS and AAF took over practically all the work of central administration and supervision, and the War Department's role was largely confined to setting levels of supply, determining intertheater priorities, and allocating shipping to overseas commands. SOS now dealt directly with WSA for single-voyage allocations of shipping, designated ports of embarkation to serve particular theaters and bases, prescribed port reserves and credits in depots behind the ports, assigned shipping to the ports as needed, regulated policy for handling supply requisitions, directed replacement of shipments lost at sea, and, outside the special jurisdiction of the AAF, shared

-317-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Global Logistics and Strategy, 1940-1943
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 780

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.