Global Logistics and Strategy, 1940-1943

By Richard M. Leighton; Robert W. Coakley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVIII
The Anglo-American Orbit

Of U.S. munitions production during 1942, approximately 19 percent was exported to Allied nations, either under lend-lease or as a result of foreign contracts negotiated earlier. If computed in terms of assignments rather than actual shipments, this proportion rises to 23 percent. In the general category of automotive vehicles -- combat and noncombat -- the proportion was higher yet. For example, approximately 42 percent of American production of 23,883 light and medium tanks in 1942 was allocated to other nations. Of the munitions exported, approximately 70 percent went to Great Britain, members of the British Commonwealth, and associated nations; 25 percent to the USSR; and the remainder to China, France, Latin America, and other countries.1 The United States served as the main reservoir for meeting supply deficiencies the other nations could not meet from their own production. In turn, where U.S. forces operated within the territories of associated powers, they drew as far as possible on local supplies in order to conserve shipping. This was what the common pool meant in the various theaters of war.

Of these theaters, all except the USSR fell within the jurisdiction of the Combined Chiefs of Staff and hence in the Anglo-American orbit, though China represents a sufficiently distinct case to merit separate treatment. By the division of strategic responsibility in March 1942, the Pacific Ocean and China fell to the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Middle East and India to the British Chiefs. The Atlantic and Europe formed an area of combined responsibility.2 Yet this determination of strategic responsibility did not necessarily solve the question of responsibility for supply. Within each broad area, forces of both nations and of their associates operated. While there was usually a supreme Allied commander at the top, channels of supply and administration were distinct. Requests to the Munitions Assignments Boards for material had to be justified by operational need in a theater, but assignments were made on a national basis, and material flowed through national supply channels. The British tenaciously clung to their prerogative to act as agents for those nations they conceived to be within their sphere of influence. In this category they classified all the members of the British Commonwealth, the refugee governments in London, and the various independent nations of the Middle East. Opposition to this British conception grew as American

____________________
1
(1) Report to the 78th Congress on Lend-Lease Operations From the Passage of the Act, March 11, 1941, to December 31, 1942, pp. 28-37. (2) Hist of Lend-lease Tanks, 11 Mar 41-31 Dec 44, File, ID. (3) Paper, prepared by WPB, no date, sub: Comparison of International Aid Asgmts and Trfs With Pdn of Maj ASP Items, in ID. (4) See below, App. C.
2
CCS 57/2, 24 Mar 42, title: Strategic Responsibility of U.S. and U.K.

-491-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Global Logistics and Strategy, 1940-1943
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 780

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.