Global Logistics and Strategy, 1940-1943

By Richard M. Leighton; Robert W. Coakley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXIII
Economy and Stabilization

Economy and system could hardly be called the keynotes of the Army's logistical operations during 1942. But to recognize this is not to disparage the significance of the trend that became evident toward the end of that year. By the following spring the trend had become more positive. Administrative reform, especially in the development of routine procedures, was marching forward on a broad front and there was much talk of economy and conservation, accompanied by some effective action. Most significant, the probable limits of war production had been authoritatively defined, and the scale of military mobilization had been compressed to fit within those limits. The trend was far from orderly, however, and was accompanied by much misdirected effort and interagency friction. In the spring of 1943 the economy drive, at least, could show few tangible results. Not until late 1943 and 1944 was the whole movement toward economy and system to reach full tide, as the period of mobilization yielded to one of stabilized and more carefully regulated effort.


The Reduced Army Supply Program

The great cutback in military supply finally ordered in November 1942 was reflected in two revisions of the Army Supply Program: that of 12 November 1942 (already in preparation while the committees were working out the Joint Chiefs' reply to Mr. Nelson's letter of 19 October), and that of 1 February 1943. The two may conveniently be analyzed together. (See Table 20.)

In the main, the reduction in requirements was accomplished by reducing the size of forces to be supplied and equipped, especially the heavily accoutered elements. Late in August the SOS staff was computing Army supply requirements for 1943 on the basis of a terminal strength of 8.2 million enlisted men. For the 1 September revision of the equipment program this figure was reduced for procurement of critical items to 7.8 million enlisted men, and for procurement of essential items to 7.5 million. Reductions were also ordered in the troop bases used for computation of the 1944 program, bringing these figures down from 9.8 million enlisted men to less than 9.5 million. The 1 September Army Supply Program formed part of the total war production program for 1943 which, despite these reductions, the WPB attacked in October as too large for the national economy to support. Accordingly, procurement goals for critical items of equipment were reduced to the amounts required for 7.5 million enlisted men, conforming to the level already ordered with respect to essential items, and the presidential "must" items in this category, wherever they exceeded computed requirements for the troop basis, were cut back to this level. The Army Supply Program that emerged from this ordeal of purgation in November had thus been

-632-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Global Logistics and Strategy, 1940-1943
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 780

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.