Global Logistics and Strategy, 1940-1943

By Richard M. Leighton; Robert W. Coakley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXVI
After Casablanca

In the weeks immediately following the Casablanca Conference, the strategic program there laid down -- build-up in the British Isles, overwhelming air bombardment of Germany, relentless offensive against the submarine, aggressive advance in the western Mediterranean, preparation for an offensive in Burma, a rapid close-in upon Rabaul, and a push into the Central Pacific -- seemed to be faltering. In the Pacific, the Guadalcanal and Buna-Gona operations came to a successful conclusion early in the year, and in February forces from Guadalcanal occupied the Russell Islands, next step up the Solomons ladder on the way to Rabaul, without opposition. But the theater commanders' estimates of the forces required to push rapidly on and take Rabaul, largely glossed over in the optimistic timetable drawn up at Casablanca, now demanded attention. The whole Pacific program remained in suspense, early in March, awaiting the verdict of a conference in Washington (the Pacific Military Conference) between Army and Navy planners there and representatives from the theaters. In Burma, meanwhile, the British drive toward Akyab, down the coast from the Indian border, had made no progress, Field Marshal Sir Archibald Wavell was becoming more and more reluctant to undertake the planned offensive in the Chindwin valley, and the feud between Stilwell and Chennault was reaching a critical stage. On the ther side of the world plans were maturing for the attack on Sicily, but the campaign in Tunisia during February and March held small promise of the early termination upon which those plans hinged. In the Kasserine-Feriana area in mid- February, the 1st Armored Division suffered severe reverses and the enemy held the initiative throughout that month and well into March. The British Eighth Army, meanwhile, was halted before the formidable Mareth Line defenses in the south. With troops and shipping being diverted to this theater, the build-up of American forces in the British Isles slowed almost to a standstill.1


Deployment Planning Adrift

With operations thus going awry, the deployment schedule approved at Casablanca began to break down. Troop movements during the first three months of 1943 flowed in different directions from those planned, and, in the aggregate, lagged behind the Casablanca forecast. (Chart 12) Late in February a committee of Army planners under OPD's direction drew up a new schedule, purportedly in consonance with changing requirements

____________________
1
(1) Memo, Wedemeyer for Marshall, 16 Mar 43, sub: Conf on Opns in Pac, ABC 370.26 (7-8-43), 4. (2) Churchill, Hinge of Fate, Bk. II, Ch. 19. (3) Howe, Operations in Northwest Africa. (4) Miller, CARTWHEEL: The Reduction of Rabaul, Ch. II. (5) See above, Chs. XV, XIX.

-687-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Global Logistics and Strategy, 1940-1943
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 780

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.