Global Logistics and Strategy, 1940-1943

By Richard M. Leighton; Robert W. Coakley | Go to book overview

Appendix F
OVERSEAS
APPENDIX F-1 -- AUTHORIZED LEVELS OF
Class I, II, III, and IV Days of Supplya
AreabClass IcClass IIClass IIIClass IV
19421943194219431942194319421943
United Kingdom6060606060456045
Iceland12090120901809012090
North Africa(d)45(d)45(d)45(d)45
Central Africae 120e 120120120120120120120
Southwest Pacifich 12090909090909090
South Pacifice h 120e 90909090909090
Hawaiian Departmente 90e 75907590759075
Chinaj 450180j450180j450180j450180
Burma and India180180180150180180180150
Bermudae 45e40453045454530
Panama, Guatemala, Ecuador, Peru, and the
Galapagos Islands
4530453045304530
Puerto Rican Sectorle 45e 30453045304530
Trinidad Sector me 60e 45604560456045
Brazil(d)e 60(d)60(d)60(d)60
Ascension Islande 150e 12090120150120150120
Alaska180180180180180180180180
Western Canada(d)60(d)60(d)60(d)60
Eastern Canadan(d)300(d)300(d)300(d)300
Newfoundland90909090150909090
Greenland180150180120180120180120
a Minimum levels. Maximum levels determined as follows: Class I (subsistance and forage) Maximum levels defined as minimum
level plus quantity (operating level or working stock) determined by port commander in collaboration with overseas commander, required
for normal consumption until expected arrival of next supply shipment. July 1943 instructions stipulated that operating levels might be
authorized by the War Department when shipping or tactical situation demanded. Exceptions similarly permitted for icebound stations.
Class II (items of supply issued under Allowance Tables) Maximum level defined as minimum level plus 90 days of supply. July 1942
instructions permitted higher operating levels, with approval of CG SOS, when shipping or tactical situation demanded. July 1943 instruc-
tions stipulated War Department approval in such cases, and made provisions for icebound stations as under Class I. Class III (fuels and
lubricants) Maximum level determined by port commander and overseas commander, as for Class I, with reference to shipping or tactical
situation and also to available storage capacity in the theater. Class IV (items of supply not issued under Allowance Tables, other than
Classes I, III, and V, such as construction equipment) Requirements to be based on mission and tactical situation; no provision for operating
level. July 1943instructions emphasized the importance of early submission of requirements to permit procurement and stockpiling. Class
V (ammunition) as released by the War Department.
b For the area in general, but see notes g, h, and j.
c Emergency rations included in Class I level of supply.

-734-

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