INDEX
Action theory, 161
Adaptation procedure: a teaching technique in which the teacher adapts the lesson to each individual member of the class,xi, 67, 81 f., 92, 358, 375, 411
Adjustment and response, 186-189
"Adventures in Character Education," ACE, 390, 392, 458, 471
Agape,239-268
Age-level calibration, 63, 83, 86
A Greater Generation,44, 199
Allport, G. W., 130, 170, 209, 424, 428, 471
Almy, Millie, 471
American Psychological Association, x, 131, 464
Analysis of variance: a statistical procedure for detecting the factors which account for variation among individuals when they are measured in some way,294, 319, 320- 326, 342, 343; definition of, 321; simple, 323; universally used, 320
Anastasi, Anne, 471
Anderson, Gladys L., 471
Anderson, Harold H., 472
Anderson, John E., xiii, 150, 363, 368, 374, 472, 474
Andrews, Thomas G., 363, 373, 472
Anxiety, 52
Attitude: a tendency on the part of the individual to give a particular meaning to some part of his experience,67, 171-178; curriculum kit, 453; formation of, 85; goals, 134, 278, 281; never "imposed," 287; measurement, 364 ff., 406 ff.; related to traits and dimensions, 280; research, 63; revision, 427; total personality, 171 f., 172
Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, xii, xiii, 286
Autocracy versus laissez faire, 101 f.
Avoidance behavior, 188
Baker, Winifred A., 472
Baldwin, Alfred L., xiii
Barker, Roger G., xiii, 462, 472
Basic assumptions, theoretical decisions, 49-54
Behavior: avoidance, 188; group-expectancy, 188; maximum potential, 189
Behaviorism, 13, 423
Biased sample, 305
Bible: in curriculum, 229, 385; illiteracy, 430
Bingham, Walter Van Dyke, xiii, 339, 371, 472
Biological sciences, 16
Boy Scouts, 105
Brand, Howard, 472
Bridges, Ronald, xiii
Brotherly love, 61
Bunting, James F., xiii, 472
Buros, Oscar Krisen, 472
Bushnell, Horace, 108
Camping: equivalent for the family group in, 116; fun as motivation for, 115; measuring the effectiveness of, 119; transfer from, 116
Cantril, Hadley, 205, 472
Carlson, Reynold E., xiii
Carmichael, Leonard, 473

-483-

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