The Monuments of Ancient Rome

By Dorothy M. Robathan | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII.
THE CAELIAN AND AVENTINE

From the valley of the Colosseum we may approach the Caelian by the Via Claudia, so-called from the Temple of the Deified Claudius which stood on the northern slope of this hill. The temple, which was begun by Agrippina the Younger, was almost completely demolished by Nero when he was erecting his Golden House, but was rebuilt by Vespasian in 69. It stood on a lofty podium and was surrounded by a colonnade, the porticus Claudii. Of the temple itself nothing remains except some substructures of the podium. These may be seen on three sides: those on the north, facing the Colosseum, contain what seem to be reservoirs, those on the east, on the Via Claudia, consist of square and semicircular recesses, which are separated from the podium by a narrow passage. Inside the convent connected with the church of Santi Giovanni e Paolo, at the top of the hill may be seen six complete arcades of travertine and three incomplete ones, all of which formed part of the west side of the colonnade. Behind each is a vaulted room of brickwork, some of which were rebuilt. There are indications that at least a part of this facade had two storeys. According to the representation on the Marble Plan the temple faced north and had six columns on the front. It was surrounded by a garden with numerous fountains and

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The Monuments of Ancient Rome
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Table of Contents *
  • Maps *
  • Plates *
  • Sources of Information 1
  • Introduction 5
  • Chapter I - Development of the City 9
  • Chapter II. The Palatin 31
  • Chapter III. - The Roman Forum 50
  • Chapter IV. - The Via Dei Fori Imperiali 89
  • Chapter V - Passeggiata Archeologica And Via Appia 110
  • Chapter VI - The Esquiline 119
  • Chapter VII. - The Caelian and Aventine 136
  • Chapter VIII. Campus Miartius 147
  • Capter IX. The Capitoline 169
  • Chapter X - The Via Del Teatro Marcello and Forum Boarium 177
  • Chapter XI. The Viminal, Quirinal and Pincian 189
  • Chapter XII. Transtiber 198
  • Plates *
  • Index 209
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