5
Consolidation

ALTHOUGH Ibn Sa'ud was back in the town of his fathers and again master of the seat of the once powerful Wahhabi state the area of his conquest was, in comparison with the vast expanse of Arabia or even with Nejd itself, an infinitesimal dot. It would be impossible to retain what had been the reward of courage if the surrounding territory were not conquered as well. The first essential was to prevent Ibn Rashid from sealing off the town and to keep a supply line open with the outside world through which food and arms could be readily obtained. If Ibn Sa'ud appreciated the danger of his position this does not appear to have been true of his enemy. 'Abd al 'Aziz Ibn Rashid, although seasoned in warfare, looked on Ibn Sa'ud as an impetuous youth who had made the mistake of setting a trap for himself from which he would be unable to escape. Sure that time would work for him Ibn Rashid was in no hurry. But Ibn Sa'ud realized that it would be his ruin to wait for his much stronger opponent behind the walls of a completely isolated desert town, even if it were a well- protected town. He did not neglect the defences. The wall, the castle and forts within and without at-Riyadh were quickly repaired and provisioned. Ibn Sa'ud saw that he must himself take the field and that he could only beat his adversary in the open where small groups could manœuvre quickly, make surprise attacks and swift withdrawals. That was how he could best defend his capture and gain time to strengthen and spread his power.

He sent messengers to his father in Kuwait. ' Abd ar-Rahman was only too willing to escape the damp heat of the coast and return to the dry highlands of the interior where, too, he would be spiritually more at ease. He left the town as unostentatiously as he

-54-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Wells of Ibn Sa'ud
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Author's Acknowledgements viii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - I Meet Wahhabi Arabia 7
  • 2 - The Town of the Consuls 13
  • 3 - The Desert Plant of Wahhabism 29
  • 4 - The Emergence of Ibn Sa'Ud 37
  • 5 - Consolidation 54
  • 6 - First Contacts with Great Britain 69
  • 7 - The Dual Monarchy 86
  • 8 - First Wahhabi Impacts 102
  • 9 - The Pilgrimage 114
  • 10 - The Arrival of the Americans 127
  • 11 - The Palestine Problem 149
  • 12 - The Arab League 167
  • 13 - Interlude and Return to Arabia 174
  • 14 - The Americans in Arabia 185
  • 15 - Agriculture and Water 203
  • 16 - The Last Audience 220
  • 17 - A Visit to Amir Sa'Ud 231
  • 18 - The Last Visit 240
  • 19 - Ibn Sa'Ud's Inheritance 247
  • Glossary 259
  • Index 265
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 270

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.