CHAPTER XXVI

Description of Lodgepole Creek ·The Deserted
Wagons · No Clue to Ownership · The Election ·
The Political Situation · Trip to Ash Hollow · Ad-
venture of Lieutenant Williams · Cannon's Puz-
zle · The Stables Finished · The Indian Scare
Over

OUR camp at Pole Creek the night of November 4, 1864, was very bleak and dreary. Pole Creek was a vast trough in the plateau. It had a bed wide enough for the Mississippi River at St. Louis. Through this bed the arroyo of the stream ran, a bed of beautiful tawny sand about a hundred yards wide, and cut down from ten to fifteen feet. Sometimes the arroyo was wider, and sometimes narrower, but from Julesburg to the crossing, thirty-five miles, there was nothing, as before stated, in the shape of a tree or bush. It was absolutely devoid of any vegetation except the grass. And above the arroyo the "flood plain" of the stream, if it could be so called, was as level as a floor for distances out of sight. Occasionally in the arroyo there were little clumps of drift roots and brush, sometimes a small, dead, drifted pine. Lodgepole Creek was said to have a well-defined bed for two hundred miles, and to head at the Cheyenne Pass, in the Rocky Mountains.

Above the crossing, which, as stated, was thirty-five miles up from Julesburg, there was no traveled roadway up Lodgepole. The only road from the crossing turned north across Jules Stretch; but, for a hundred miles up-stream from the crossing, the smooth bed of Lodgepole was said to furnish a most excellent route west to the mountains. The stream seemed to have no tributary of any consequence. A few miles above the crossing there was another

-264-

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The Indian War of 1864
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter III 23
  • Chapter IV 31
  • Chapter V 39
  • Chapter VI 46
  • Chapter VII 56
  • Chapter VIII 68
  • Chapter IX 80
  • Chapter X 92
  • Chapter XI 104
  • Chapter XII 119
  • Chapter XIII 130
  • Chapter XIV 139
  • Chapter XV 148
  • Chapter XVI 157
  • Chapter XVII 169
  • Chapter XVIII 176
  • Chapter XIX 186
  • Chapter XX 196
  • Chapter XXI 207
  • Chapter XXIV 242
  • Chapter XXV 252
  • Chapter XVII 264
  • Chapter XXVIII 288
  • Chapter XXIX 298
  • Chapter XXX 307
  • Chapter XXXI 314
  • Chapter XXXII 324
  • Chapter XXXIII 335
  • Chapter XXXIV 345
  • Chapter XXXV 358
  • Chapter XXXVI 369
  • Chapter XXXVII 380
  • Chapter XXXVIII 393
  • Appendices 407
  • Appendix B. - Lieut. Fitch's Report on the Smoky Hill Route. 419
  • Appendix C. 426
  • Abbreviated Titles Cited in the Notes 429
  • Notes 431
  • Index 475
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