Charles James Fox: a Man for the People

By Loren Dudley Reid | Go to book overview

11
The First Foreign Secretary 1782

[Mr. Fox's] astonishing parliamentary exertions will be remembered with the highest applause as long as oratory is held in estimation--that is to say, as long as the constitution exists.

Earl of Charlemont

Unwilling subjects are little better than enemies.

Charles James Fox

Now it was necessary to form a new Government. To manage preliminary negotiations the King had chosen his former Attorney General, Thurlow, since 1778 Lord Chancellor. Thurlow was tall, dignified, stately, impressive, sparkle-eyed and bushy browed: no man ever was so wise as Thurlow looks, Fox had once said, and the description stuck. Thurlow had enjoyed spectacular success as a barrister before entering the Government and as a parliamentary debater was one of North's dependable aides. His firm belief that in the dispute with the Colonies the Crown was fully in the right also stamped him in the King's eyes as a man of worth. He had a talent for secret negotiation; he could keep a sturdy foot in each camp. With his combination of gifts he was able to serve as Lord Chancellor in four different administrations--those of North, Rockingham, Shelburne, and Pitt.

The negotiations that ensued, starting shortly before North resigned and continuing at full speed for several days, would stagger the imagination of anyone who believes in human reasonableness. In the name of principle so much inflexibility was displayed on both sides that it is easy to apportion it generously. The possibilities of forming an administration under Gower, who had already, resigned from the ministry, and Shelburne, were explored, but neither had sufficient strength. Rockingham was approached but lie sent the King a four- point ultimatum of terms under which lie would undertake to form a new administration. The King found little relish in any of them: he learned that he must not veto independence for America; the contractors' Bill, excluding holders of government contracts from membership in the Commons, must be passed; revenue officials must be

-136-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Charles James Fox: a Man for the People
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 480

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.