Charles James Fox: a Man for the People

By Loren Dudley Reid | Go to book overview

13
Mr Secretary Fox 1783

Great Britain and the United States must still be inseparable, either as Friends or Foes. This is an awful and important Truth.

David Hartley

King and press spoke as one: the coalition was unpopular. But unpopular or not, it was in the saddle. For the second time in thirteen months, Fox found himself at the post of Foreign Secretary, and resumed his duties with earnestness and zeal.

On the floor of the Commons the new Government had to perform certain housekeeping duties; among other matters, to repeal the prohibitory Acts against the Americans and to make better arrangements to manage trade and commerce between them and the mother country. From Fox to the King flowed a steady stream of notes, just as in earlier days the stream had flowed from North. Fox's communications were gracious and explicit, models of correctness; the King's replies brief and pointed. Fox concluded one of his longer epistles: 'Whenever Your Majesty will be graciously pleased to condescend even to hint your inclinations upon any subject, that it will be the study of Your Majesty's Ministers to show how truly sensible they are of Your Majesty's goodness.'1

This passage carries particular significance. Considering his many strong utterances against the throne, Fox indeed humbled himself to write it. The King's dislike was broad bottomed, however, so on the letter he wrote only the grim endorsement: 'No answer.' Perhaps Fox can be accused of obsequiousness, but at least one person was confident that Fox was sincere in attempting to create a working relationship with the King: the Duke of Queensberry later told George that Fox had every disposition to comply with his wishes. 'I can assert as an undoubted fact that there was scarcely any proof of his personal devotion, or any sacrifice that he would not have made, to acquire your favour.' The King retorted that Fox never said as much to him. 'No, sir,' replied the Duke, 'assuredly he did not, because your Majesty never gave him any encouragement. . . .'2

____________________
1
Fortescue, vi, 357. April 16, 1783. Fox Cor., ii, 123--4.
2
Wraxall reports the conversation, iii, 119-20.

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Charles James Fox: a Man for the People
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 480

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.