Charles James Fox: a Man for the People

By Loren Dudley Reid | Go to book overview

16
Mr Pitt and Mr Fox 1785-1787

Damn his good speeches, let me hear of his making a bad one.

Charles James Fox

So far in the contest between Pitt and Fox, Pitt had achieved a luminous victory on the coalition issue but Fox had emerged as the champion of Westminster. Now Pitt was to suffer reverses on two other issues debated in the early months of 1785.

A month after the scrutiny had been abandoned, Pitt faced one of the crowded Houses of his career to date to unfold a plan of parliamentary reform. Among other changes he proposed to disfranchise thirty-six rotten boroughs, each returning two members, and to assign these seats to the largest counties and to the cities of London and Westminster. The changes were to be made gradually, with recompense to those interested in the boroughs being disfranchised. North and Burke spoke against the proposal; Wilberforce and Dundas supported Pitt. Fox, overlooking his shabby treatment at Pitt's hand, earnestly entreated both sides of the House to support Pitt's motion. The division was 248 to 174 against it. More than a decade went by before it was again seriously taken up in the House.

The complex Irish question also came up for debate. A year previously the Irish Chancellor of the Exchequer had visited Pitt, bringing with him ten resolutions to reduce tariffs and in other ways to liberalize commercial intercourse between Great Britain and Ireland. This notion appealed to Pitt, but he later introduced a highly provocative issue: that in return Ireland should make a substantial contribution to imperial defence. In January 1785 the British Cabinet had approved the revised plan, and its proposals were passed by the Irish Parliament after heated debate, emerging as a series of eleven resolutions.1 The Irish in their turn made an important alteration. Pitt wanted the surplus of the Irish hereditary revenue above the sum of ₤656,000 to be contributed to the common defence; the Irish Parliament modified this proposal by stating that the surplus should be allocated 'in such manner

____________________
1
See the invaluable analysis of the Anglo-Irish proposals in Vincent T. Harlow, The Founding of the Second British Empire, 1763-1793 ( London, 1952), i, 558 ff.

-214-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Charles James Fox: a Man for the People
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 480

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.