Charles James Fox: a Man for the People

By Loren Dudley Reid | Go to book overview

28
Road to War 1802-1803

A speech more craftily formed to inspire despondency and dismay was perhaps never delivered.

The Times

The truth is . . . it was my best.

Charles James Fox

The Peace of Amiens aroused in many Englishmen the desire to see Paris again. Thousands made the trip across the Channel that summer, Fox among them. His immediate excuse was to locate materials for his history, so he invited his private secretary, John Bernard Trotter, a nephew of his good friend the Bishop of Down, to go along to read and copy. Trotter not only served in this capacity but also took notes for a life of Fox; although at first he intended to write a full biography, like many others who have undertaken Brobdingnag he settled for Lilliput. His Memoirs of the Latter rears of . . . Charles James Fox1 proved to be a curious account of Fox's doings as they intrigued Trotter, his close associations with Fox and with the great and near-great they met on the continental trip, with a delightfully blended image of Fox and Trotter, Trotter and Fox stirred in throughout. Other letter writers and journal-keepers on the Continent that summer also recorded Fox's visit but Trotter provides the most intimate narrative. The party, including Mr and Mrs Fox--for the 'Mrs A' of all these years was now revealed as his long-wedded wife2--and Trotter, left St Anne's Hill, by coach, on July 29, 1802.

As Fox's carriage went from city to city on the way to Paris, the travellers noted many changes produced by the war. The revolutionary fury had spent itself upon a convent in Cassell, demolishing the convent and destroying its garden; in Lisle there was not a single gentle

____________________
1
Quotations in this chapter not otherwise identified are from this volume.
2
On August I she wrote Harriet, signing herself--for the first time in her life?--' E. Fox.' 'This is has [sic] long been my name but till now Mr F. had reasons for not wishing it to be known but has them no longer.' On August 12, she wrote Caroline the same news, saying that 'a Secret which never need have been one is now divulged' (Holland House MSS.).

Lady Bessborough, Georgiana's younger sister, reflected a prevailing opinion when she wrote: 'The odd thing is that people who were shocked at his having a mistress are still more so at that mistress having been his wife for so long' ( Georgiana, p. 250).

-382-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Charles James Fox: a Man for the People
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 480

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.