Canada and the Law of Nations: A Selection of Cases in International Law, Affecting Canada or Canadians, Decided by Canadian Courts, by Certain of the Higher Courts in the United States and Great Britain and by International Tribunals

By Norman MacKenzie; Lionel H. Laing | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

Oh, ye'll tak' the high road an' I'll tak' the low road, An' I'll be in Scotland before ye; . . .

These words of the Scottish ballad might be fittingly applied to Canada and the British Colonies to the south, for the latter, taking the "low road," so to speak, in 1776, declared their independence of George III and his friends, while Canada, unwilling to follow their example, kept to the "high road." Today, however, Canada, without resort to arms, is to all intents and purposes an independent nation of the international community, but with a last road yet to travel, the road to the southward leading to the Union of American Republics. Indeed, so far has Canada proceeded on the high road to independence that two Canadians with Scotch names, Norman MacKenzie and Lionel H. Laing, have now prepared a case book on International Law for their country and its citizens under the title, Canada and the Law of Nations, with a Foreword by a former distinguished Prime Minister of the Dominion, the late Sir Robert Borden. Perhaps it is not immaterial to mention that the writer of this brief Introduction was himself born in Canada, of Scottish parents, and, notwithstanding the fact that he is a loyal citizen of the United States, he has nevertheless not only a deep interest, but also an affection for Canada and things Canadian, and because of this interest and affection he is especially happy to say a word in behalf of this notable undertaking.

It may seem strange to the uninitiated--meaning in this connection the good people of the United States--that an elaborate case book on the Law of Nations, composed largely of cases decided by Canadian courts, should also include cases decided--to quote from the sub-title--"by certain of the higher courts in the United States and Great Britain and by international tribunals." In their Preface, however, the editors have amply justified their inclusion of cases from non-Canadian jurisdictions. Thus of cases decided by courts of the United States they have chosen those which have reference to Canada as well as to the United States. It was but natural also that they should include cases originally decided in Canada but subsequently passed upon by the Judicial Committee

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Canada and the Law of Nations: A Selection of Cases in International Law, Affecting Canada or Canadians, Decided by Canadian Courts, by Certain of the Higher Courts in the United States and Great Britain and by International Tribunals
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Introduction vii
  • Editors' Preface xi
  • Table of Contents xvii
  • List of Abbreviations xxvii
  • A. Canada, an International Entity 1
  • B. Jurisdiction Over Territory 30
  • C. Status of Indians 180
  • D. Individuals in International Law 221
  • E. International Rights and Duties 335
  • F. Private International Law 402
  • G. War and Its Effects 441
  • Index 555
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 570

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.