The Life of Peter Van Schaack, LL. D: Embracing Selections from His Correspondence and Other Writings during the American Revolution, and His Exile in England

By Henry Cruger Van Schaack | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI.

THE state of Mr. Van Schaack's health was now such as to demand his attention; and he determined to make a voyage to Europe, for the purpose of availing himself of the skill of an experienced oculist, in an operation upon the cataract inhis eye. In view of the numerous severe and trying scenes through which he had passed, and the reflections arising from which were preying upon his mind, a change of scene was highly desirable; nor is it surprising, that with so many grievous afflictions pressing upon him, his imagination should have "colored high and shaded deep" upon the public measures, as suggested in Mr. Jay's answer to the following letter.


TO JOHN JAY.

Kinderhook, June 3d, 1778.

DEAR SIR:

We were much disappointed in not seeing you on your return, and the more so as I fear we cannot promise ourselves the pleasure of a visit from you very soon. I intended, under your protection, to have accompanied you part of the way down, but when all hopes of seeing you were gone, I took upon me to ride as far as Claverack, for which I flatter myself it will not be difficult to procure an indemnity, if it be not justified by what has happened; however, I could wish to have a pass in form to ride about a little, for which I once before wrote you in a letter that I suspect has never reached you. My friends are continually recommending little excursions, with which my judgment, more I assure you than my inclination, coincides; but this kind of amusement becomes the more necessary, as I am directed to refrain from reading and writing, which is a restraint peculiarly hard in my present situation; but being calculated to avert a greater hardship, is to be submitted to as much as possible.

-106-

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The Life of Peter Van Schaack, LL. D: Embracing Selections from His Correspondence and Other Writings during the American Revolution, and His Exile in England
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I 1
  • To Henry Van Schaack. 9
  • To Henry Van Schaack. 10
  • To Henry Van Schaack. 12
  • Chapter II 16
  • To John Vardill. 23
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 25
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 27
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 29
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 30
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 35
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 37
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 39
  • From Henry Cruger, Junior. 43
  • From Henry Cruger, Junior. 44
  • From Henry Cruger, Junior. 45
  • Chapter III 48
  • From the Same. 52
  • From the Same. 53
  • Chapter IV. 71
  • To Mrs. Van Schaack. 77
  • To Mrs. Van Schaack. 78
  • To Mrs. Van Schaack. 79
  • To Mrs. Van Schaack. 80
  • To Mrs. Van Schaack. 82
  • To Mrs. Van Schaack. 84
  • Chapter V 95
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 97
  • To John Jay. 97
  • To John Jay. 99
  • To John Jay. 99
  • To John Jay. 101
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 103
  • Chapter VI 106
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 107
  • To Theodore Sedgwick 118
  • Theodore Sedgwick to Aaron Burr. 119
  • Theodore Sedgwick to Aaron Burr. 121
  • Chapter VII. 130
  • Chapter VIII 164
  • Chapter IX 185
  • To His Son. 191
  • To His Son. 192
  • To His Son. 193
  • To His Son. 196
  • To His Son. 199
  • To His Son. 201
  • Chapter X 205
  • To His Son. 206
  • To His Son. 209
  • To His Son. 210
  • To His Son. 211
  • To His Son. 213
  • To His Son. 215
  • To His Son. 217
  • To His Son. 219
  • To His Son. 221
  • To His Son. 223
  • To His Son. 225
  • To His Son. 227
  • To His Son. 230
  • To His Son. 233
  • Chapter XI 236
  • Chapter XII 257
  • Chapter XIII 278
  • To H----- W-----. 279
  • To H----- W-----. 280
  • To H----- W-----. 281
  • To H----- W-----. 282
  • To H----- W-----. 282
  • To H----- W-----. 284
  • To H----- W-----. 285
  • To H----- W-----. 286
  • To H----- W-----. 287
  • To H----- W-----. 290
  • To H----- W-----. 290
  • To H----- W-----. 290
  • To H----- W-----. 291
  • To H----- W-----. 293
  • To H----- W-----. 294
  • To H----- W-----. 296
  • To H----- W-----. 296
  • To H----- W-----. 297
  • To H----- W-----. 298
  • Chapter XIV 300
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 301
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 303
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 306
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 307
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 308
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 310
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 311
  • Chapter XV 314
  • To Henry Van Schaack. 318
  • To Henry Van Schaack. 321
  • To His Brothers. 323
  • To the Same. 326
  • To the Same. 327
  • To the Same. 331
  • To the Same. 334
  • To the Same. 335
  • To the Same. 341
  • Chapter XVI 343
  • To Henry Van Schaack. 345
  • To Henry Van Schaack. 348
  • To Henry Van Schaack. 349
  • To Henry Van Schaack. 351
  • To Henry Van Schaack. 353
  • To Henry Van Schaack. 354
  • To Henry Van Schaack. 355
  • To Henry Van Schaack. 356
  • To Henry Van Schaack. 358
  • To Henry Van Schaack. 359
  • To Henry Van Schaack. 360
  • To Peter Silvester. 363
  • From Henry Van Schaack. 364
  • From Henry Van Schaack. 366
  • Chapter XVII 369
  • From Gouverneur Morris. 371
  • From Gouverneur Morris. 372
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 374
  • Chapter XVIII 385
  • Chapter XIX 393
  • Chapter XX 404
  • To His Son. 406
  • To His Son. 407
  • To His Son. 409
  • To His Son. 410
  • To His Son. 411
  • To His Son. 412
  • To His Son. 413
  • To His Son. 414
  • From Robert Yates. 416
  • From Thomas Hayes. 416
  • From Thomas Hayes. 417
  • From Thomas Hayes. 419
  • From Thomas Hayes. 421
  • Chapter XXI 425
  • To His Son. 426
  • To His Son. 429
  • To the Same. 430
  • To the Same. 431
  • To the Same. 432
  • To the Same. 433
  • To the Same. 434
  • To the Same. 435
  • To the Same. 437
  • From Ambrose Spencer. 440
  • From James Vanderpoel. 441
  • Chapter XXII 447
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 458
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 459
  • To Peter Van Schaack. 460
  • Appendix. 467
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