The Black Tulip

By Alexander Dumas; David Coward | Go to book overview

A CHRONOLOGY OF ALEXANDRE DUMAS
1762 25 March: Birth at Saint-Domingo of Thomas-Alex-
andre, son of the French-born Marquis Davy de la
Pailleterie and Marie-Cessette Dumas. After returning to
France in 1780, he enlists in 1786 and rises rapidly
through the ranks during the Revolution.
1802 24 July: Birth at Villers-Cotterêts of Alexandre Dumas,
second child of General Dumas and Marie-Louise-Eliza-
beth Labouret, an innkeeper's daughter.
1806 26 February: Death of General Dumas. Alexandre is brought up in straitened circumstances by his mother. He
attends local schools and has a happy childhood.
1819 Dumas, now a lawyer's office-boy, falls in love with Adèle
Dalvin who rejects him. Meets Adolphe de Leuven, with
whom he collaborates in writing unsuccessful plays.
1822 Visits Leuven in Paris, meets Talma, the leading actor of the day, and resolves to become a playwright.
1823 Moves to Paris. Enters the service of the Duke d'Orléans. Falls in love with a seamstress, Catherine Labay.
1824 27 July: Birth of Alexandre Dumas fils, author of La Dame aux camélias.
1825 22 September: Dumas's first performed play, written in
collaboration with Leuven and Rousseau, makes no
impact.
1826 Publication of a collection of short stories, Dumas's first
solo composition, which sells four copies.
1827 A company of English actors, which includes Kean,
Kemble, and Mrs Smithson, performs Shakespeare in
English to enthusiastic Paris audiences: Dumas is deeply
impressed. Liaison with Mélanie Waldor.
1828-9 Dumas enters Parisian literary circles through Charles
Nodier.
1829 11 February: First of about 50 performances of Henry III

-xxvi-

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