The American Senator

By Anthony Trollope; John Halperin | Go to book overview

think that any such spark was wanted. Morton did get a seat beside her and managed to take away her muff and one of her shawls, but she gave them to him almost she might have done to a servant. She smiled indeed,-- but she smiled as some women smile at everybody who has any intercourse with them. 'I think perhaps Mrs. Morton will let us go upstairs,' said Lady Augustus. Mrs. Morton immediately rang the bell, and prepared to precede the ladies to their chambers. Let them be as insolent as they would she would do what she conceived to be her duty. Then Lady Augustus stalked out of the room and her daughter swum after her. 'They don't seem to be quite the same as they were in Washington,' said the Senator.

John Morton got up and left the room without making any reply. He was thoroughly unhappy. What was he to do for a week with such a houseful of people? And then, what was he to do for all his life if the presiding spirit of the house was to be such a one as this? She was very beautiful,--certainly. So he told himself; and yet as he walked round the park he almost repented of what he had done. But after twenty minutes' fast walking he was able to convince himself that all the fault on this occasion lay with the mother. Lady Augustus had been fatigued with her journey and had therefore made everybody near her miserable.


CHAPTER XIII
AT BRAGTON

WHEN the ladies went upstairs the afternoon was not half over and they did not dine till half-past seven. As Morton returned to the house in the dusk he thought that perhaps Arabella might make some attempt to throw herself in his way. She had often done so when they were not engaged, and surely she might do so now. There was nothing to prevent her coming down to the library when she had got rid of her travelling clothes, and in this hope he looked into the room. As soon as the door was

-83-

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The American Senator
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on the Text xv
  • Select Bibliography xvi
  • A Chronology of Anthony Trollope xix
  • Contents xxvii
  • Chapter I Dillsborough 1
  • Chapter II the Morton Family 8
  • Chapter II the Morton Family 22
  • Chapter II the Morton Family 35
  • Chapter VII the Walk Home 42
  • Chapter II the Morton Family 47
  • Chapter II the Morton Family 54
  • Chapter X Goarly's Revenge 62
  • Chapter II the Morton Family 69
  • Chapter II the Morton Family 76
  • Chapter II the Morton Family 83
  • Chapter II the Morton Family 90
  • Chapter II the Morton Family 97
  • Chapter XVI Mr. Gotobed's Philanthropy 103
  • Chapter II the Morton Family 110
  • Chapter II the Morton Family 117
  • Chapter XIX 'Who Valued the Geese?' 125
  • Chapter II the Morton Family 132
  • Chapter XXI the First Evening at Rufford Hall 138
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 145
  • Chapter XXIII Poor Caneback 152
  • Chapter XXIV the Ball 158
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 165
  • Chapter XXVII 'Wonderful Bird!' 180
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 187
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 192
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 200
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 207
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 215
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 229
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 235
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 241
  • Chapter XXXVII How Things Were Arranged 248
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 261
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 269
  • Chapter XLI the Senator is Badly Treated 277
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 284
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 291
  • Chapter XLIV 'Particularly Proud of You' 299
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 306
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 313
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 319
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 326
  • Chapter Xlix Miss Trefoil's Decision 334
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 341
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 348
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 363
  • Chapter LV 'I Have Told Him Everything' 376
  • Chapter LVI 'Now What Have You Got to Say?' 383
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 390
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 398
  • Chapter XXII Jemima 405
  • Chapter LX Again at Mistletoe 413
  • Chapter LXI the Success of Lady Augustus 418
  • Chapter LXI the Success of Lady Augustus 425
  • Chapter LXI the Success of Lady Augustus 433
  • Chapter LXI the Success of Lady Augustus 440
  • Chapter LXV the New Minister 448
  • Chapter LXI the Success of Lady Augustus 453
  • Chapter LXI the Success of Lady Augustus 460
  • Chapter LXI the Success of Lady Augustus 475
  • Chapter LXI the Success of Lady Augustus 481
  • Chapter LXI the Success of Lady Augustus 488
  • Chapter LXXII 'Bid Him Be a Man' 496
  • Chapter LXXIII 'Is It Tanti?' 503
  • Chapter LXXIII 'Is It Tanti?' 511
  • Chapter LXXIII 'Is It Tanti?' 523
  • Chapter LXXIII 'Is It Tanti?' 530
  • Chapter LXXIII 'Is It Tanti?' 545
  • Chapter LXXIII 'Is It Tanti?' 552
  • Explatory Notes 559
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