The Protestant Reformation in Sixteenth-Century Italy

By Salvatore Caponetto; Anne C. Tedeschi et al. | Go to book overview

formal conviction for heresy. And only persons in this first category might be liable to the agony of being burned alive. A much more frequently dispensed sentence, one to a carcere perpetuo, "life" imprisonment, usually meant, as it often does today, a reclusion of only a few years.

As the title of the volume itself implies, the Reformation in Italy is the subject. But to the author's credit, he includes a short chapter touching on the émigrès religionis causa. The fact is, that long after any traces of the Reformation had been extinguished in the peninsula proper (with the Waidensian exception), the cultural achievements of the Italian religious refugees in bringing to northern Europe the thought and literature, the theological, philological, scientific, technological, juridical, and economic advances of the Italian Renaissance continued to have an impact. One needs only to think, in the realm of theology alone, of the contributions to Anglican liturgy and polity made by Peter Martyr Vermigli or to the Polish Minor Church by Fausto Sozzini, who helped to found a movement bearing his name, Socinianism, which would spread across the continent and traverse the ocean. It is the European-wide dimensions of the Italian Reformation, not only its heroic but ultimately failed penetration in the peninsula alone, which gives significance to and explains the continuing strong appeal of this field of study. The Protestant Reformation in Sixteenth-Century Italy is a rare, comprehensive introduction to a fascinating, still developing subject rewarding serious scholarly attention.

Anne C. Tedeschi and John Tedeschi

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Protestant Reformation in Sixteenth-Century Italy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 452

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.