The Protestant Reformation in Sixteenth-Century Italy

By Salvatore Caponetto; Anne C. Tedeschi et al. | Go to book overview

3
FROM THE SPOKEN TO THE WRITTEN WORD

THE IMPACT OF PRINTING

"RARELY HAS ONE INVENTION had more decisive influence than that of printing on the Reformation."1 The reformers, beginning with Luther, considered it a divine gift. In 1563 John Foxe wrote in his Book of Martyrs: "the Lord began to work for his church, not with sword and target to subdue his exalted adversary, but with printing, writing, and reading.... Wherefore, I sunppose, that either the pope must abolish printing, or he must seek a new world to reign over; for else, as this world stands, printing doubtless will abolish him."2

In Italy too, in this early phase when the new ideas circulated primarily through the spoken word from the pulpit, even though the name of the excommunicated German monk was never mentioned, there was a desire to learn more about him and his teachings, to read with one's own eyes his assertion that a true reform of the church required a return to the Gospel of Christ.

A document uncommon for its clarity and simplicity provides a glimpse of daily life in the 1520s, with its longings, preoccupations, and anxieties provoked by the religious revolution in Germany. I allude to a letter written to his father in Padua, on 18 February 1524 by Girolamo, brother of Francesco Negri, future author of the Tragedia del libero arbitrio, who was at the time a Benedictine in the monastery of Santa Giustina in Padua under his religious name of Fra Simeone da Bassano. Girolamo had gone to visit his brother at San Giorgio Maggiore in Venice where he was attending to some business of his religious house. Girolamo had been sent by their father to inquire about rumors that Simeone was an admirer of Martin Luther, even to the

____________________
1
E. Eisenstein, The Printing Press as an Agent of Change: Communications and Cultural Transformations in Early-Modern Europe, 2 vols. ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1978), 1:309.
2
The Acts and Monuments of the Church: Containing the History and Sufferings of the Martyrs ( New York: Worthington, N.D.), 355.

-18-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Protestant Reformation in Sixteenth-Century Italy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 452

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.