The Protestant Reformation in Sixteenth-Century Italy

By Salvatore Caponetto; Anne C. Tedeschi et al. | Go to book overview

4
THE "LUTHERAN TIDE" (1517-1546)

LUTHER'S FIRST FOLLOWERS

ACCORDING TO THE FRENCH HISTORIAN LÉONARD, that period of western European history that runs from the first promulgation of Luther's theses against indulgences ( 1517) to the reformer's death in 1546, can be characterized as the "Lutheran tide."1 Despite the appearance on the scene of reformers of the stature of Ullrich Zwingli, Martin Bucer, and John Calvin during that grand phase of religious history that forever stamped the first half of the century, the greatest inspirational force behind all the reform movements outside the Roman obedience remained the great theologian and professor of Wittenberg.

Better than anyone else in the Italian milieu, this fascination for the German reformer was expressed by Pietro Carnesecchi, in one of the most tormented hours of his life. He was fully conscious of the risk he ran when he admitted to inquisitors at his Roman trial in 1567 (interrogation of 3 December): "We were of the opinion that he [ Luther] was a great man because of his wisdom and eloquence, and we also held that he acted sincerely in his own way, namely that he did not deceive others if he was not first deceived by his own opinions."2

In Italy too, during these years, Luther's doctrines circulated widely, in part through his own writings or those of his collaborators and followers, or by word of mouth and the proselytizing efforts of numerous German students in Padua, Siena, Pavia, and Bologna, of merchants, soldiers, school teachers; or anyone else who had traveled or lived in countries where the Reformation had become rooted as the alternative Christian church to the "papist."

Only a few persons of a higher-than-average cultural level knew and appreciated the theology of Zwingli and only one of his works apparently was translated into

____________________
1
E. G. Leonard, A History of Protestantism, I: The Reformation ( London and Edinburgh: Nelson, 1965), 183.
2
Processo Carnesecchi,325-26.

-39-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Protestant Reformation in Sixteenth-Century Italy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 452

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.