The Protestant Reformation in Sixteenth-Century Italy

By Salvatore Caponetto; Anne C. Tedeschi et al. | Go to book overview

10
ITALY'S OTHER GATEWAY: THE ISTRIA OF THE VERGERIO BROTHERS

THE REFORM EFFORTS OF BISHOPS GIOVAN BATTISTA AND PIER PAOLO VERGERIO

IF THE WALDENSLAN VALLEYS were Calvinism's gateway into Italy, Istria was a great open door for the penetration of Lutheran doctrines. Venetian Istria bordered several Habsburg dominions, Styria, Carniola, and Carinthia, favorable to the Lutheran Reformation, supported by members of the nobility and bourgeoisie. At Lubiana a Lutheran conventicle had formed as early as 1527. The Confessio Augustana had spread so widely that in 1578, Duke Charles of Habsburg, faced by the tenacious resistance of the population, made the commitment to respect its freedom of belief (religious pacification of Bruck). During the entire century, this strip of Venetian territory experienced a period of grave economic depression, a consequence of the war between Venice and the Empire that concluded with the Treaty of Worms in 1521. The plague, malaria, loss of population, conflicts among the clergy over benefices that constituted a major source of income, and the abandonment of many dioceses by their bishops created a desolate situation. The spiritual needs of the people were tended by a few parish priests, who shared their miserable lives and administered the sacraments with some regularity, and by the many confraternities dispersed in the four dioceses of Capodistria, Pola, Parenzo, and Cittanova.

The Roman Curia was preoccupied with the looming threat from the very first appearances of the religious dissent. The Venetian nuncio, Girolamo Aleandro, in a dispatch to the papal secretary in Rome, Pietro Carnesecchi, dated 28 January 1534, described the spread of the Protestant penetration, and confirmed the proselytizing of Bartolomeo Fonzio and his followers:

We have recently discovered that in a territory of this [Venetian] state called Pirano, the majority of the population and its leading citizens are Lutheran. And we fear that the same is true for the neighboring areas bordering Germany and Hungary, where the heresy was born more than four years ago

-142-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Protestant Reformation in Sixteenth-Century Italy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 452

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.