The Jungle Books

By Rudyard Kipling; W. W. Robson | Go to book overview

Mowgli's Brothers

Now Rann the Kite brings home the night
That Mang the Bat sets free--
The herds are shut in byre and hut
For loosed till dawn are we.
This is the hour of pride and power,
Talon and rush and claw.
Oh hear the call!--Good hunting all
That keep the Jungle Law!
Night-Song in the Jungle

IT was seven o'clock of a very warm evening in the Seeonee* hills when Father Wolf woke up from his day's rest, scratched himself, yawned, and spread out his paws one after the other to get rid of the sleepy feeling in their tips. Mother Wolf lay with her big gray nose dropped across her four tumbling, squealing cubs, and the moon shone into the mouth of the cave where they all lived. 'Augrh!' said Father Wolf, 'it is time to hunt again'; and he was going to spring down hill when a little shadow with a bushy tail crossed the threshold and whined: 'Good luck go with you, O Chief of the Wolves; and good luck and strong white teeth go with the noble children, that they may never forget the hungry in this world.'

It was the jackal -- Tabaqui,* the Dish-licker -- and the wolves of India despise Tabaqui because he runs about making mischief, and telling tales, and eating rags and pieces of leather from the village rubbish-heaps. But they are afraid of him too, because Tabaqui, more than any one else in the jungle, is apt to go mad, and then he forgets that he was ever afraid of any one, and runs through the forest biting everything in his way. Even the tiger runs and hides when little Tabaqui goes mad, for madness is the most disgraceful thing that can overtake a wild creature. We call it hydrophobia, but they call it dewanee -- the madness-- and run.

'Enter, then, and look,' said Father Wolf, stiffly; 'but there is no food here.'

-1-

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The Jungle Books
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contents ii
  • Title Page iii
  • The Jungle Books vi
  • Introduction xii
  • Select Bibliography xxxv
  • A Chronology of Kipling's Life and Works xxxviii
  • The Jungle Book xliii
  • Preface xlv
  • Mowgli's Brothers 1
  • Kaa's Hunting 22
  • Tiger! Tiger! 48
  • The White Seal 67
  • Rikki-Tikki-Tavi 87
  • Toomai of the Elephants 104
  • Her Majesty's Servants 125
  • The Second Jungle Book 145
  • Contents 147
  • How Fear Came 149
  • The Miracle of Purun Bhagat 168
  • Letting in the Jungle 183
  • The Undertakers 212
  • The King's Ankus 235
  • Quiquern 254
  • Red Dog 278
  • The Spring Running 303
  • Appendix A - In the Rukh 326
  • Appendix B - Ye Dare Not Look Him Between the Eyes' (the Jungle Book, P. II) 350
  • Explanatory Notes First Jungle Book 352
  • Explanatory Notes Second Jungle Book 362
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