The Jungle Books

By Rudyard Kipling; W. W. Robson | Go to book overview

The Spring Running

Man goes to Man! Cry the challenge through the Jungle! He that was our Brother goes away. Hear, now, and judge, O ye People of the Jungle,-- Answer, who shall turn him--who shall stay?

Man goes to Man! He is weeping in the Jungle: He that was our Brother sorrow sore! Man goes to Man! (Oh, we loved him in the Jungle!) To the Man-Trail where we may not follow more.

THE second year after the great fight with Red Dog and the death of Akela, Mowgli must have been nearly seventeen years old. He looked older, for hard exercise, the best of good eating, and baths whenever he felt in the least hot or dusty, had given him strength and growth far beyond his age. He could swing by one hand from a top branch for half an hour at a time, when he had occasion to look along the tree-roads. He could stop a young buck in mid-gallop and throw him sideways by the head. He could even jerk over the big, blue wild boars that lived in the Marshes of the North. The Jungle People who used to fear him for his wits feared him now for his strength, and when he moved quietly on his own affairs the mere whisper of his coming cleared the wood-paths. And yet the look in his eyes was always gentle. Even when he fought, his eyes never blazed as Bagheera's did. They only grew more and more interested and excited; and that was one of the things that Bagheera himself did not understand.

He asked Mowgli about it, and the boy laughed and said: 'When I miss the kill I am angry. When I must go empty for two days I am very angry. Do not my eyes talk then?'

'The mouth is hungry,' said Bagheera, 'but the eyes say nothing. Hunting, eating, or swimming, it is all one--like a stone in wet or dry weather.' Mowgli looked at him lazily from under his long eyelashes, and, as usual, the panther's head dropped. Bagheera knew his master.

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The Jungle Books
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contents ii
  • Title Page iii
  • The Jungle Books vi
  • Introduction xii
  • Select Bibliography xxxv
  • A Chronology of Kipling's Life and Works xxxviii
  • The Jungle Book xliii
  • Preface xlv
  • Mowgli's Brothers 1
  • Kaa's Hunting 22
  • Tiger! Tiger! 48
  • The White Seal 67
  • Rikki-Tikki-Tavi 87
  • Toomai of the Elephants 104
  • Her Majesty's Servants 125
  • The Second Jungle Book 145
  • Contents 147
  • How Fear Came 149
  • The Miracle of Purun Bhagat 168
  • Letting in the Jungle 183
  • The Undertakers 212
  • The King's Ankus 235
  • Quiquern 254
  • Red Dog 278
  • The Spring Running 303
  • Appendix A - In the Rukh 326
  • Appendix B - Ye Dare Not Look Him Between the Eyes' (the Jungle Book, P. II) 350
  • Explanatory Notes First Jungle Book 352
  • Explanatory Notes Second Jungle Book 362
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