Propaganda, Politics, and Violence in Cambodia: Democratic Transition under United Nations Peace-Keeping

By Steve Heder; Judy Ledgerwood | Go to book overview

mid-April 1993, his unit had received new instructions that authorized attacks on certain categories of UNTAC personnel. Citing a three-page "Political Study Program" issued in the name of "101," he said the new instructions were that NADK units could fire on UNTAC forces after first determining their nationalities. For example, they were not to fire on "Chinese, Thais, Indonesians, or Nicaraguans" or forces from "weak countries" or "developing countries" generally. This left UNTAC personnel from developed countries fair game. 76


Conclusion

The evidence presented by self-demobilizers suggests that at one level, PDK nonparticipation in Phase Two and other parts of the peace process laid out in the Paris Agreements was not a foregone conclusion. Although it reveals and confirms important and intentional violations of the treaty, it belies any simple assertion that the PDK never intended to go along with the terms of the Paris Agreements. Rather, it suggests that the PDK leaders and the troops they controlled believed themselves ready to participate in demobilization and elections. The evidence indicates the breakdown of the agreements occurred over political rather than military questions. In other words, the breakdown came about because the PDK believed they could get away with stretching the political terms of the agreements to the breaking point, while at the same time believing that SOC and UNTAC were seriously violating them by failing to implement the Paris Agreements "properly." To achieve their political aims, and to pressure SOC, the PDK initially applied limited military pressure. Later, when the political situation did not move substantially in their favor, the PDK escalated militarily in what proved to be a failed attempt to scuttle the whole process.


Notes
1.
This term is used to refer to the overt manifestations of the political organization covertly led by Pol Pot, Nuon Chea, Ta Mok, Khieu Samphan, and other surviving members of the Standing Committee of the Communist Party of Kampuchea. It was originally used to distinguish the PDK from the other elements that formed the Coalition Government of Democratic Kampuchea. After the Paris Agreements, it was used to distinguish it from the other Cambodian signatories. The Khmer term for this group, pheaki, refers to a party to an agreement. It does not mean party in the sense of a political party.

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Propaganda, Politics, and Violence in Cambodia: Democratic Transition under United Nations Peace-Keeping
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 280

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.