Propaganda, Politics, and Violence in Cambodia: Democratic Transition under United Nations Peace-Keeping

By Steve Heder; Judy Ledgerwood | Go to book overview

Conclusion

This chapter has attempted to cast light on events affecting Vietnamese communities in Cambodia during the period of UNTAC's mandate. While stressing the primary role of the PDK as an agent of racist violence against Vietnamese, it has also shown how each of the other Cambodian signatories to the Paris Agreements and UNTAC itself contributed to the process, which saw some communities almost entirely dispossessed and transformed into a refugee population. Confronted by the complex interplay of violence and political opportunism, UNTAC made a number of difficult choices. Vigorous action to prevent--or at least contain--ethnically motivated violence, certainly within the UN mandate, was ruled out as being beyond UNTAC's means and likely to interfere with other parts of its mission. UNTAC's decision makers instead concentrated on responding to factional demands for the verification of the withdrawal of foreign forces. Relegating attacks on ethnic Vietnamese communities to the status of an "internal security" issue, UNTAC interpreted its mandate in a manner that served the perceived interests of political compromise with the factions, rather than the goals of human rights protection set forth in the Paris Agreements.

Hindsight now affords a perspective on the impact of UNTAC's choices on Cambodia's future direction. The establishment of a democratically elected government was the first step in a vast and long-term process. That process may involve the emergence and development of a Cambodian civil society that promotes the widest possible tolerance of the country's real ethnic diversity, rather than a dangerous myth of racial purity. This will require responsible, nondiscriminatory government policies, which at a minimum conform to internationally established standards that promote practices that redress the inequalities of the past. It will also require international support.

Sadly, however, as Cambodia emerged from the UNTAC period, all indicators revealed a trend in the opposite direction. Discrimination on the grounds of ethnicity was enshrined in the constitution. The press, and more quietly the UN-recognized government, harped upon "ethnic issues," consistently raising the specter of Cambodia's "traditional';-- racial--antipathies. The communities displaced during the period of UNTAC's mandate remained dispossessed and faced very slim prospects of returning to their homes, let alone gaining Cambodian resi

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Propaganda, Politics, and Violence in Cambodia: Democratic Transition under United Nations Peace-Keeping
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 280

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.