The Emergence of Deviant Minorities: Social Problems and Social Change

By Robert W. Winslow | Go to book overview

Racism in American Society
The Kerner Report

SUMMARY OF REPORT

Introduction
The summer of 1967 again brought racial disorders to American cities, and with them shock, fear, and bewilderment to the nation. The worst came during a two-week period in July, first in Newark and then in Detroit. Each set off a chain reaction in neighboring communities.On July 28, 1967, the President of the United States established this Commission and directed us to answer three basic questions:
What happened?
Why did it happen?
What can be done to prevent it from happening again?

To respond to these questions, we have undertaken a broad range of studies and investigations. We have visited the riot cities; we have heard many witnesses; we have sought the counsel of experts across the country.

This is our basic conclusion: Our nation is moving toward two societies, one black, one white -- separate and unequal. Reaction to last summer's disorders has quickened the movement and deepened the division. Discrimination and segregation have long permeated much of American life; they now threaten the future of every American.

This deepening racial division is not inevitable. The movement apart can be reversed. Choice is still possible. Our principal task is to define that choice and to press for a national resolution.

To pursue our present course will involve the continuing polar-

____________________
From the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, Report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders ( Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1968), pp. 1-7.

-14-

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