Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant

By Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII.

ATTACK ON GRAND GULF --OPERATIONS BELOW VICKSBURG
CAPTURE OF PORT GIBSON --GRIERSON'S RAID --OCCUPATION
OF GRAND GULF
--MOVEMENT UP THE BIG BLACK --BATTLE
OF RAYMOND
--MOVEMENT AGAINST JACKSON --FALL OF
JACKSON
--INTERCEPTING THE ENEMY --BATTLE OF CHAM -
PION'S HILL --BATTLE OF BLACK RIVER BRIDGE --CROSSING
THE BIG BLACK
--INVESTMENT OF VICKSBURG--ASSAULTING
THE WORKS
.

ON the 24th my headquarters were with the advance at Perkins' plantation. Reconnoissances were made in boats to ascertain whether there was high land on the east shore of the river where we might land above Grand Gulf. There was none practicable. Accordingly the troops were set in motion for Hard Times, twenty-two miles farther down the river and nearly opposite Grand Gulf. The loss of two steamers and six barges reduced our transportation so that only 10,000 men could be moved by water. Some of the steamers that had got below were injured in their machinery, so that they were only useful as barges towed by those less severely injured. All the troops, therefore, except what could be transported in one trip, had to march. The road lay west of Lake St. Joseph. Three large bayous had to be crossed. They were rapidly bridged in the same manner as those previously encountered.

On the 27th McClernand's corps was all at Hard Times, and McPherson's was following closely. I had determined to make the attempt to effect a landing on the east side of the river as soon as possible. Accordingly, on the morning of the 29th, Mc- Clernand was directed to embark all the troops from his corps

NOTE.--On this occasion Governor Richard Yates, of Illinois, happened to be on a visit to the army, and accompanied me to Carthage. I furnished an ambulance for his use and that of some of the State officers who accompanied him.

-279-

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Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction vii
  • Preface. 7
  • Contents 9
  • Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. 15
  • Chapter II 32
  • Chapter III 54
  • Chapter IV 74
  • Chapter V 98
  • Chapter VI 115
  • Chapter VII 137
  • Chapter VIII 160
  • Chapter IX 187
  • Chapter X 220
  • Chapter XI 250
  • Chapter XII 279
  • Chapter XIII 312
  • Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. Vol. II 345
  • Chapter XIV 347
  • Chapter XV 381
  • Chapter XVI 423
  • Chapter XVIII 505
  • Chapter XIX 563
  • Chapter XX 599
  • Chapter XXI 635
  • Index 667
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