Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant

By Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIX.
THE BATTLE OF FRANKLIN --THE BATTLE OF NASHVILLE --EXPEDITION AGAINST FORT FISHER--ATTACK ON THE FORT -- FAILURE OF THE EXPEDITION --SECOND EXPEDITION AGAINST THE FORT--CAPTURE OF FORT FISHER --SHERMAN'S MARCH NORTH--SHERIDAN ORDERED TO LYNCHBURG --CANBY ORDERED TO MOVE AGAINST MOBILE--MOVEMENTS OF SCHOFIELD AND THOMAS--CAPTURE OF COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA-SHERMAN IN THE CAROLINAS--ARRIVAL OF THE PEACE COMMISSIONERS--LINCOLN AND THE PEACE COMMISSIONERS --AN ANECDOTE OF LINCOLN --THE WINTER BEFORE PETERSBURG--SHERIDAN DESTROYS THE RAILROAD --GORDON CARRIES THE PICKET LINE--PARKE RECAPTURES THE LINE -- THE BATTLE OF WHITE OAK ROAD .

AS we have seen, Hood succeeded in crossing the Tennessee River between Muscle Shoals and the lower shoals at the end of October, 1864. Thomas sent Schofield with the 4th and 23d corps, together with three brigades of Wilson's cavalry to Pulaski to watch him. On the 17th of November Hood started and moved in such a manner as to avoid Schofield, thereby turning his position. Hood had with him three infantry corps, commanded respectively by Stephen D. Lee, Stewart and Cheatham. These, with his cavalry, numbered about forty-five thousand men. Schofield had, of all arms, about thirty thousand. Thomas's orders were, therefore, for Schofield to watch the movements of the enemy, but not to fight a battle if he could avoid it; but to fall back in case of an advance on Nashville, and to fight the enemy, as he fell back, so as to retard the enemy's movements until he could be reinforced by Thomas himself. As soon as Schofield saw this movement of Hood's, he sent his trains to the rear, but did not fall back himself until the 21st, and then only to Columbia. At Columbia there was a slight skirmish but no battle. From this place Schofield then

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Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction vii
  • Preface. 7
  • Contents 9
  • Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. 15
  • Chapter II 32
  • Chapter III 54
  • Chapter IV 74
  • Chapter V 98
  • Chapter VI 115
  • Chapter VII 137
  • Chapter VIII 160
  • Chapter IX 187
  • Chapter X 220
  • Chapter XI 250
  • Chapter XII 279
  • Chapter XIII 312
  • Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. Vol. II 345
  • Chapter XIV 347
  • Chapter XV 381
  • Chapter XVI 423
  • Chapter XVIII 505
  • Chapter XIX 563
  • Chapter XX 599
  • Chapter XXI 635
  • Index 667
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