Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant

By Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXI.

MORALE OF THE TWO ARMIES--RELATIVE CONDITIONS OF THE NORTH AND SOUTH--PRESIDENT LINCOLN VISITS RICHMOND --ARRIVAL AT WASHINGTON--RESIDENT LINCOLN'S ASSAS- SINATION--PRESIDENT JOHNSON'S POLICY--SHERMAN AND JOHNSTON--JOHNSTON'S SURRENDER TO SHERMAN--CAP- TURE OF MOBILE--WILSON'S EXPEDITION--CAPTURE OF JEF- FERSON DAVIS--GENERAL THOMAS'S QUALITIES--ESTIMATE OF GENERAL CANBY--THE END OF THE WAR--THE MARCH TO WASHINGTON--ONE OF LINCOLN'S ANECDOTES--GRAND RE- VIEW AT WASHINGTON--CHARACTERISTICS OF LINCOLN AND STANTON--ESTIMATE OF THE DIFFERENT CORPS COMMAND- ERS--CONCLUSION.

AFTER the fall of Petersburg, and when the armies of the Potomac and the James were in motion to head off Lee's army, the morale of the National troops had greatly improved. There was no more straggling, no more rear guards. The men who in former times had been falling back, were now, as I have already stated, striving to get to the front. For the first time in four weary years they felt that they were now nearing the time when they could return to their homes with their country saved. On the other hand, the Confederates were more than correspondingly depressed. Their despondency increased with each returning day, and especially after the battle of Sailor's Creek. They threw away their arms in constantly increasing numbers, dropping out of the ranks and betaking themselves to the woods in the hope of reaching their homes. I have already instanced the case of the entire disintegration of a regiment whose colonel I met at Farmville. As a result of these and other influences, when Lee finally surrendered at Appomattox, there were only 28,356 officers and men left to be paroled, and many of these were without arms. It was probably this latter fact which gave rise to the statement sometimes made, North and South, that Lee surrendered a smaller number of men than what the official

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Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction vii
  • Preface. 7
  • Contents 9
  • Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. 15
  • Chapter II 32
  • Chapter III 54
  • Chapter IV 74
  • Chapter V 98
  • Chapter VI 115
  • Chapter VII 137
  • Chapter VIII 160
  • Chapter IX 187
  • Chapter X 220
  • Chapter XI 250
  • Chapter XII 279
  • Chapter XIII 312
  • Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. Vol. II 345
  • Chapter XIV 347
  • Chapter XV 381
  • Chapter XVI 423
  • Chapter XVIII 505
  • Chapter XIX 563
  • Chapter XX 599
  • Chapter XXI 635
  • Index 667
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