Executive Power and Soviet Politics: The Rise and Decline of the Soviet State

By Eugene Huskey | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Like other projects conceived at the end of the Soviet era, this book had a long and difficult gestation. Its appearance is a tribute to the patience and flexibility of the contributors, whose topics underwent a dizzying transformation in the final months of 1991.

In editing and preparing the manuscript for publication, I was assisted at Stetson University by the staff of the DuPont-Ball Library and by Michael Connelly, Don Gast, Kim Simonds, and Judy Usher in the Department of Political Science. It is a pleasure to acknowledge their work. I am also grateful to the Knight Foundation and the Jessie Ball dupont Fund for financial support.

DeLand, Florida May 1992

Note on Transliteration and Usage. The transliteration system used here is that of the Library of Congress. Exceptions to that system have been made in the case of surnames widely used in the Western press (thus, Yeltsin rather than El'tsin). The term 'government' has several meanings in English. Government is capitalized here when it refers to the institution (pravitel'stvo, Sovet ministrov, Kabinet ministrov) that sits atop the state's executive agencies.

-ix-

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Executive Power and Soviet Politics: The Rise and Decline of the Soviet State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xiii
  • The State in Imperial Russia and the Ussr 1
  • 1: The Government in the Soviet Political System 3
  • 2: Party-State Relations 49
  • 3: Executive-Legislative Relations 83
  • Notes 98
  • 4: The Rise of Presidential Power Under Gorbachev 106
  • The State and the Economy 127
  • 5: The Ministry of Finance 129
  • 6: The Industrial Ministries 143
  • 7: The Agricultural Ministries 161
  • The State and Security 179
  • 8: The Ministry of Defense 181
  • 9: The Ministry of Internal Affairs 202
  • 10: The Administration of Justice: Courts, Procuracy, and Ministry of Justice 221
  • The State and the Future 247
  • 11: The Rebirth of the Russian State 249
  • Index 271
  • Contributors 281
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